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John Legend

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ohn Legend From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia John Legend

John Legend in BangkokBackground informationBirth nameJohn Roger StephensBornDecember 28, 1978 (age 32)OriginSpringfield, Ohio, United StatesGenresR&B, hip hop soul, soul, neo soul, jazz fusionOccupationsSinger-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, actorInstrumentsVocals, piano, keyboardsYears active2001–presentLabelsGOOD, Sony MusicAssociated actsKanye West, Jay-Z, Kid Cudi, Lupe Fiasco, The RootsWebsitejohnlegend.comJohn Roger Stephens (born December 28, 1978), better known by his stage name John Legend, is an American recording artist, musician and actor. He is the recipient of nine Grammy Awards, and in 2007, he received the special Starlight award from the Songwriters Hall of Fame.[1]

Prior to the release of his debut album, Stephens' career gained momentum through a series of successful collaborations with multiple established artists. Stephens added his voice to those of other artists, assisting in them reaching chart-topper hits. He lent his voice to that of Kanye West, on Slum Village's "Selfish" and Dilated Peoples' "This Way". Other artists included Jay-Z's "Encore", and he sang backing vocals on Alicia Keys' 2003 song "You Don't Know My Name" and Fort Minor's "High Road." Stephens played piano on Lauryn Hill's "Everything Is Everything."

Contents [hide]1 Life and career1.1 1978–2009: Early life and career beginnings1.2 2004–2005: Get Lifted1.3 2006–2007: Once Again1.4 2008–2010: Evolver1.5 2010–Present: Wake Up!1.6 Collaborations1.7 Music videos and acting career2 Endeavors2.1 Television appearances and commercials2.2 Charitable Endeavors & Philanthropy2.3 Endorsements2.4 Private "Fan Appreciation" Events3 Discography4 Filmography5 See also6 References7 External links[edit] Life and career[edit] 1978–2009: Early life and career beginningsStephens was born on December 28, 1978, in Springfield, Ohio.[2] He is the son of Phyllis, a seamstress, and Ronald, a factory worker and former National Guardsman.[3][4] Throughout his childhood, Stephens was homeschooled on and off by his mother.[5] At the age of four, he began playing the piano and at the age of seven, he performed with his church choir. When he was ten, his parents divorced, causing his mother to suffer a breakdown.[4] At the age of 12, Stephens attended North High School, from which he graduated four years later.[6] He graduated salutatorian.

According to Stephens, he was offered scholarships to Harvard University, Georgetown University and Morehouse College.[7] He attended the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied English with an emphasis on African American literature.[8] While in college, he helmed Counterparts, a co-ed jazz and pop a cappella group as president (1997–1998) and musical director (1998–1999). Stephens' lead vocals on the group's recording of Joan Osborne's "One of Us" propelled the song to critical acclaim[9] landing the song on the track list of the 1998 Best of Collegiate a Cappella compilation CD. Stephens was also a member of the prestigious Sphinx Senior Society while an undergraduate at Penn. While in college, Stephens was introduced to Lauryn Hill by a friend. Hill hired him to play piano on "Everything Is Everything", a song from her album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill.[7]

During this period, Stephens took time to hold a number of shows around Philadelphia, eventually expanding his audience base to New York, Boston, Atlanta, and Washington, D.C. He finished college in 1999, and thereafter began producing, writing, and recording his own music. He released two albums independently; his self-titled demo (2000) and 'Live at Jimmy's Uptown' (2001), which he sold at his shows.

After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania, Stephens began working as a management consultant for the Boston Consulting Group.[6] During this time, he began working on his demo and began sending his work to various record labels.[5][10] In 2001, Devo Springsteen introduced Stephens to then up-and-coming hip-hop artist Kanye West; Stephens was hired to sing during the hooks of West's music. After signing to West's label, he chose his stage name from a nickname that was given to him by poet J. Ivy, due to Stephens' "old-school sound".[7][11] Stephens' vocals can be heard on several tracks including Alicia Keys' "You Don't Know My Name", Jay-Z's "Encore", Kanye West's "Never Let Me Down", Dilated Peoples' "This Way" and Slum Village's "Selfish".

[edit] 2004–2005: Get LiftedStephens released his debut album, Get Lifted, in December 2004. It debuted at number seven on the Billboard 200, selling 116,000 copies in its first week.[12] It went on to sell 2.1 million copies in the United States and was certified Platinum by the RIAA.[13][14] It has sold three million copies worldwide.[7] The album produced two singles: "Ordinary People" (US and UK top 30) went straight to number one and "Used to Love U" (US top 100, UK top 30).[citation needed]

[edit] 2006–2007: Once AgainThe first single from his second album, Once Again, was "Save Room". The album was released October 24, 2006, and boasts production from Kanye West, Raphael Saadiq, and will.i.am. In an interview with MTV, he said that this album contained his favorite song that he had written to date, entitled "Again." He said he came up with the idea for the song and wrote some of it while sitting on a subway. He stated that the song was also the inspiration for the album's title[citation needed].

In August 2006 Stephens appeared in an episode of Sesame Street. He performed a song entitled "It Feels Good When You Sing a Song", a duet with Hoots the Owl.[15] He also performed during the pregame show of Super Bowl XL in Detroit and the halftime show at the 2006 NBA All-Star Game.[16][17]

[edit] 2008–2010: EvolverStephens released his third studio album Evolver, in October 2008.[18] Rapper Andre 3000 of OutKast is featured on the first single of the album on a song titled "Green Light". "It's going to be a surprise for a lot of John Legend fans, because it is a lot more upbeat than John is — than people think John is," Andre insisted. "I was actually happy to hear it. This is a cool John Legend song".[19] The next single from Evolver was confirmed as "Everybody Knows".[20]

Speaking in July 2008 to noted UK R&B writer Pete Lewis of the award-winning "Blues & Soul", he explained his reasons for titling the album 'Evolver': "Well I think people sometimes come to expect certain things from certain artists. They expect you to kind of stay in the same place you were at when you started out. Whereas I feel I want my career to be defined by the fact that I'm NOT gonna stay in the same place, and that I'm always gonna try new things and experiment. So, as I think this album represents a manifestation of that, I came up with the title 'Evolver'."[21]

In 2009, Stephens performed in The People Speak a documentary feature film that uses dramatic and musical performances of the letters, diaries, and speeches of everyday Americans, based on historian Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States”.[22]

[edit] 2010–Present: Wake Up!John Legend and The Roots teamed up to record a collaborative album,[23] Wake Up!, which was released on September 21, 2010.[24] The first single released off the album was "Wake Up Everybody" featuring singer Melanie Fiona and rapper Common; a video for the song has been released.[25][26] "Hard Times" is the second single.

In February 2011 John won three Grammy Awards (one by himself and two with The Roots) at the 53rd Annual Grammy Music Awards Ceremony. Legend won a Grammy Award for Best R&B Song for "Shine", and he and The Roots won Grammy Awards for Best R&B Album (Wake Up!) and Best Traditional R&B Vocal Performance for "Hang On In There". In March 2011 Legend and the Roots won two NAACP Image Awards – one for Outstanding Album (Wake Up!) and one for Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration.

Legend is currently preparing to go on a 50-date tour in Summer 2011 as a guest for British Soul band Sade.

[edit] CollaborationsIn 2005 was featured in the Fort Minor song "High Road".In 2006 was featured in Sérgio Mendes's collaboration album, Timeless, singing "Please Baby Don't".In 2006 collaborated with Jay-Z on the album Kingdom Come on the song "Do U Wanna Ride".Collaborated with Japanese R&B duo CHEMISTRY on their 2006 single "Tōkage".Collaborated with Mary J. Blige on "King & Queen".In 2007 lent his vocals for the Rich Boy track "Ghetto Rich".In 2008 collaborated with Colombian Rock artist Juanes at the Latin Grammys, singing in Spanish along with Juanes, on the bilingual version of the song "Si tu estas ahi" also known as "If You Are Out There".Featured in The Black Eyed Peas song, "Like That". The song "Ordinary People" was originally meant to be for a Black Eyed Peas project, but he decided to keep it for himself and recorded the song after he had been signed to Columbia Records.Tentatively worked with Michael Jackson on a future album. In a Dutch interview with singer and host Tommy Parker, he was asked about this collaboration. His response was that he had written one song for the upcoming album, but was unsure about whether Jackson would be using it.[27]Sang "The Girl is Mine" and the national anthem along with Stephen Colbert on The Colbert Report.Featured on the sixth track ("Heartbreaker") of MSTRKRFT's second album Fist of God.He collaborated with Fergie for her song "Finally" on her 2006 debut album "The Dutchess".Featured in T.I.'s song "Slide Show" on his album Paper Trail. A music video for "Slide Show" was released on August 10, 2009, featuring a video collage; it is unknown as of yet, however, if it is an official single.[28]He is also featured in the song "Magnificent" by Rick Ross. The music video has cameo appearances from DJ Khaled saying and wearing "We the Best!!", Birdman, Ace Hood, Triple C's, and Special Ed. It was released on March 3, 2009, and it was directed by music video director Gil Green. It was filmed at Gulfstream Park Racetrack in Hallandale Beach, Florida. The two later collaborated on the songs "Sweet Life" and "Free Mason," the former of which failed to make the cut for the follow-up album, Teflon Don, and the latter of which featured rapper Jay-Z as well.Co-wrote (and played piano on) "Move on Me" by British singer-songwriter Fin Greenall (a.k.a Fink) from the album "Sort of Revolution" (2009)Collaborated with Reggae legend Buju Banton on the track "Can't Be My Lover". The track is one of the biggest mixes of R&B and Reggae/Dancehall in years.In 2009 recorded a duet with Brazilian singer Ana Carolina called "pt:Entreolhares (The Way You’re Looking at Me)". He sings in English, and she sings in Portuguese.In the summer of 2009 he recorded a duet with ex-member of Sin Bandera, Noel Schajris, called "No Importa" (It Doesn't Matter). He sings in English and Spanish.In 2009 a duet version "Save Room" featuring German band, Monrose, was released under the title "Save Room (Let's Get Strictly Physical)".Has plans to collaborate with British born talent, Stefan Vitalis, to produce a soulful and dynamic record.Recorded a cover of the U2 song "Pride (in the name of love)"Collaborated with Nas for the title track on DJ Khaled's 2010 album Victory.In 2010 collaborated with Pink and Herbie Hancock for a recording of Peter Gabriel's song "Don't Give Up", which featured on Hancock's album The Imagine Project.Collaborated with Lupe Fiasco on the track "Never Forget You."Collaborated with Kanye West on the song "Blame Game" on West's album My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy.In September 2010 collaborated with British dubstep trio, Magnetic Man, on a track entitled "Getting Nowhere".[edit] Music videos and acting careerHis cover of Stevie Wonder's 1974 hit song "Don't You Worry 'Bout a Thing" appeared in Will Smith/Eva Mendes' film Hitch and on the soundtrack album of the movie.

The 2007 video for his single, "P.D.A. (We Just Don't Care)", features Alexandre Rodrigues and Melvin Bragg from the critically acclaimed film, City of God.

Songs attributed to John Legend have appeared in feature films, as follows:

"Refuge" appears on the soundtrack to the 2006 film The Second Chance."Dare to Dream" is in the 2007 movie Pride."Someday" is part of the soundtrack to the 2007 film August Rush."Shine" was written for the end credits of the 2010 film Waiting for Superman.He has a supporting, singing-only role in the 2008 movie Soul Men, where he plays the deceased lead singer of a fictitious soul group that includes Samuel L. Jackson and Bernie Mac. Although he has no real dialogue in the film, he only sings a song called "I'm Your Puppet" along with Jackson and Mac.

[edit] Endeavors[edit] Television appearances and commercialsPerformed "God Bless America" during the 7th inning stretch at the 2006 Major League Baseball All Star Game in Pittsburgh, PA.[29]Appeared on the season finale of Curb Your Enthusiasm, singing a cover of "You Don't Know Me". He also appeared on an episode of the television series "Las Vegas" in February 2007, performing his single "Save Room" solo at the end of the episode.In 2007 performed with John Mayer and Corinne Bailey Rae at the Grammy Awards. He later appeared with Bailey Rae in several live performances.Appeared in a recent commercial for a Lexus SUV, in which Legend is shown listening to Nina Simone's "Backlash Blues" (recorded live in Paris, 1968, on The Great Show LP) and describing his experience with the music. He is also notable for performing closing music in many of Apple Inc CEO Steve Jobs' keynote presentations.In January 2008 sang in a video for Barack Obama, produced by Will.I.Am called "Yes We Can".[30]Performed "America The Beautiful" at WrestleMania XXIV on Sunday March 30, 2008 at the Citrus Bowl in Orlando, Florida.[31]In a 2008 Target commercial performed a piece of his song "Slow Dance" to pitch his new album "available exclusively at Target." The commercial was shown during online streaming episodes of NBC programs.In 2008 performed several numbers live in front of tens of thousands of fans during the "Welcome to America" July 4 celebration on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, in Philadelphia, PA.Performed at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver in September 2008.Appeared on Real Time with Bill Maher on October 31, 2008. He was a member of the panel and performed "If You're Out There" at the end of the show.Appeared on CNN Heroes 2008, which was taped November 22, 2008, and was televised November 27, 2008.Appeared to perform the song in duet with Colombian rock singer Juanes during the 9th Annual Latin Grammy Awards at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas on November 13, 2008. The version they performed was sung mostly in Spanish by both singers, with only a few lines in English.On Sunday, January 18, 2009, performed at the We Are One:The Obama Inaugural Celebration at the Lincoln Memorial, singing James Taylor's "Shower the People" with James Taylor and Jennifer Nettles of Sugarland.On Friday, February 13, 2009, he was a guest and performed on The Ellen DeGeneres Show. John performed his song, "Everybody Knows" from his album, Evolver.Performed at the 2009 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition Launch party at LAX in Las Vegas on February 12, 2009.Performed at the 2009 NBA All-Star Game halftime show on February 15, 2009.Performed at the 81st Academy Awards on February 22, 2009, singing "Down to Earth" nominated for Best Original Song.[32][33]On an episode of The Colbert Report which aired March 7, 2008, performed "The Girl Is Mine" with Stephen Colbert. It was a remake of the Michael Jackson/Paul McCartney hit. Returned to The Colbert Report on April 14, 2008, performing "The Star-Spangled Banner" with Stephen Colbert, opening the show's week in Philadelphia. He later appeared in Colbert's Christmas special A Colbert Christmas: The Greatest Gift of All, where he performed an ode to nutmeg. His fourth appearance aired September 9, 2010, when he performed a tribute to returning American troops in the second half of the two-part special Been There, Won That: The Returnification of the Ameri-Can-Do Troopscape. He sung "Coming Home" from his 2006 album Once Again.On Sunday, May 17, 2009, served as commencement speaker for the University of Pennsylvania's 2009 graduation ceremonies. Amy Goodman happened to be in the audience, and she televised the speech the following Tuesday, May 19, 2009 on Democracy Now!.[34]On June 12, 2009, co-hosted ESPN's Mike and Mike in the Morning on the ESPN2/ESPN Radio simulcast with Mike Greenberg. He sat in for Mike Golic.On August 23, 2010, performed at the 2010 Miss Universe Pageant, Evening Gown segment, in Las Vegas, Nevada.On October 27, 2010, performed the American National Anthem for the 2010 World Series opener.On October 30, 2010, performed at the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear with The Roots.On February 24, 2011, Legend appeared on the season 2 finale of Royal Pains.Interviewed by host John Jacobsen as the third guest on the first season of PBS television's The Artist Toolbox.[edit] Charitable Endeavors & PhilanthropyLegend performs during the first night of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado.On July 7, 2007, he participated in the Live Earth concert in London, performing "Ordinary People". On July 8, 2007, he participated in the Montreux Jazz Festival in Montreux, Switzerland, with India.Arie. On July 11, 2007, he participated in the Jazz Open Festival in Stuttgart, Germany, with Amy Winehouse. On September 21, 2008, he also performed at the Royal Albert Hall in London, UK in conjunction with the Peace One Day concert. He sang "Green Light" and "If You're Out There".

The Show Me Campaign,[35] through which his fans are encouraged to donate funds toward improving the living situations and prospects of victims of extreme poverty in Mbola, Tanzania, is another example of Stephens' charitable involvement. In early 2008, he began touring with Professor Jeff Sachs of Columbia University's Earth Institute to promote sustainable development as an achievable goal.

Stephens returned to his hometown of Springfield, Ohio on Christmas Eve 2007 for a "Coming Home Christmas Benefit Concert" in the auditorium of North High School. The performance featured several local talent from Springfield, including Legend's younger brother Vaughn Anthony Stephens, who helped organize the concert. The performance also featured a tribute to Jason Collier, and proceeds went to a scholarship fund set up in his name for local high schoolers.[36]

After reading Professor Jeffrey Sachs' book, The End of Poverty, Stephens was inspired to visit Ghana to learn more about making life better for the people who live under the poverty line. This is when he started his "Show Me Campaign" in 2007. With this campaign, Stephens called on his fans to help him in his initiative for those who reside in Bossaso Village[where?] and non-profit organizations that the campaign partners with.

Legend returns to his hometown of Springfield, Ohio, to give a free benefit concert in support of Barack ObamaIn 2007 Stephens was the spokesman for GQ Magazine's "Gentlemen's Fund", an initiative to raise support and awareness for five cornerstones essential to men: opportunity, health, education, environment, and justice.[citation needed]

In May 2007 he partnered with Tide laundry detergent to raise awareness about the need of families in St. Bernard Parish, (Slidell, LA) one of the most devastated areas hit by Hurricane Katrina. He spent a day folding laundry at the Tide "clean start" mobile laundromat and visited homes which Tide is helping to rebuild in that community.

In October 2007 he became involved[clarification needed] with a project sponsored by The Gap, a retail clothing store chain in the United States. Through their "project red campaign" (also called "2 WEEKS"), The Gap's contribution to their global fund from the sale of each (2 WEEKS) t-shirt is equivalent to the average cost of 2 weeks of anti-retroviral medicine in Africa, which enables people living with HIV to lead healthy, normal lives.

In 2009 Stephens gave AIDS Service Center NYC permission to remix his song "If You're Out There" to create a music video promoting HIV/AIDS awareness and testing.[37]

Stephens claims to have contributed a share of the proceeds of some tickets for his August 13, 2009, concert at Madison Square Garden to The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Stephens is also the National spokesperson for and has performed benefit concerts for "Management Leadership for Tomorrow (MLT). MLT is a national non-profit organization that has made ground-breaking progress assisting the next generation of African American, Hispanic and Native American leaders in major corporations, non-profit organizations and entrepreneurial ventures.[clarification needed][citation needed]

On January 22, 2010, he performed "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child" on the Hope for Haiti Now telethon show.[38]

On September 8, 2010, John Legend joined the national board of Teach for America.[39] Legend also sits on the boards of The Education Equality Project and the Harlem Village Academies, and serves as co-chair (with Rupert Murdoch) of the Harlem Village Academies’ National Leadership Board.

On September 9, 2010, he performed "Coming Home" on the Colbert Report as a tribute song for the end of combat operations in Iraq, and for the active troops and the veterans of the United States Armed Forces.[40]

In 2011, he contributed the track "Love I've Never Known" to the Red Hot Organization's most recent album "Red Hot+Rio 2." The album is a follow-up to the 1996 "Red Hot+Rio." Proceeds from the album sales will be donated to raise awareness and money to fight AIDS/HIV and related health and social issues.

[edit] EndorsementsStephens is currently a spokesperson for the Baileys line of alcoholic beverages. He also spoke on behalf of The Polka Dotz at Milwaukee's 2008 German Fest.

He performed and spoke at his alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania, on behalf of the Barack Obama Presidential campaign in April 2008.[41] He later performed "If You're Out There" from the album Evolver and a duet of Will.i.am's "Yes We Can" at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Also, he performed a half-hour set list in support of Barack Obama in his hometown of Springfield, as well as at The Ohio State University and Wright State University campuses on September 29, 2008.

[edit] Private "Fan Appreciation" EventsOn July 26, 2007, Stephens hosted a John Legend Network Members Only Party and Concert called "The Kings & Queens Bash" at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia. There were 500 participants in attendance and he introduced the acts from his new label, Homeschool Records to his John Legend Network fans: Estelle, his brother, Vaughn Anthony Stephens, Lucy Woodward and The James Gang. Harmonicist Frederic Yonnet performed as a special guest.

On July 25, 2008, at the Highline Ballroom in New York City,[42] John Legend planned another annual private event for his fans who are members of the John Legend Network called "John Legend Unplugged". Legend performed a 21-song set list, including several songs from his Evolver album. This allowed John Legend Network members to be the first to hear the new songs. After the party, John greeted each individual on their way out and took pictures with fans.

On February 8, 2011 John Legend performed at Arizona State University's Gammage Auditorium for a Black History Month event presented by the Undergraduate Student Government.

[edit] DiscographyMain article: John Legend discographyGet Lifted (2004)Once Again (2006)Evolver (2008)Wake Up! (with The Roots) (2010)[edit] FilmographyTelevisionYearTitleRoleNotes2006Sesame StreetHimself

2007Curb Your EnthusiasmHimself/PerformerSeason 6 Finale, 'The Bat Mitzvah'Las VegasHimself/PerformerSeason 4 Episode 11, 'Wagers of Sin'2008A Colbert Christmas: The Greatest Gift of AllForest RangerChristmas Special2009The People SpeakHimselfDocumentary2010Dancing with the StarsHimself/Performer

2011Royal PainsHimself/Performer"Listen to the Music"FilmYearTitleRoleNotes2008Sesame Street: Elmo Loves You!Himself

Soul MenMarcus Hooks

[edit] See alsoList of awards and nominations received by John Legend[edit] References^ "Songwriters Hall of Fame". Induction for John Legend. Artisan News. June 22, 2007. Retrieved 2009-06-26.^ Southern, Nathan. "John Legend – Biography". Allmovie. Retrieved 2009-06-05.^ "Soul savior?". The Washington Times. 2005-04-14. Retrieved 2009-06-27.^ a b Simpson, Dave (2005-08-22). "Legend in his own lunchtime". The Guardian (London: Guardian Media Group). Retrieved 2008-12-05.^ a b Watson, Margeaux (2006-11-03). "Spotlight: John Legend". Entertainment Weekly. Time. Retrieved 2009-07-22.^ a b "Singer/songwriter John Legend got early start". USA Today (Gannett Company). 2005-07-28. Retrieved 2009-06-27.^ a b c d Newsome, Melba (2006-10-22). "Music; What Becomes John Legend Most?". The New York Times (The New York Times Company): pp. 1–2. Retrieved 2009-07-21.^ du Lac, J. Freedom (February 9, 2006). "The Best New Artist Is Already a Legend". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2006-02-09.^ "Rarb Review". RARB. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ Hall, Rashaun (2004-10-18). "Kanye's Hook Singer, John Legend, Ready For The Spotlight". MTV News. Retrieved 2009-07-22.^ "John Legend: Legend in his lifetime". The Independent (London: Independent News & Media). 2005-02-18. Retrieved 2009-07-22.^ Whitmire, Margo (2005-01-05). "'Encore' Enjoys Another Week At No. 1". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. Retrieved 2009-07-21.[dead link]^ Crosley, Hillary (2008-04-29). "Legend Seeking Ad Savvy For New Album". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. Retrieved 2009-07-21.^ "RIAA – Gold & Platinum". RIAA. Retrieved 2008-12-26.^ "Legend, Foxx Hangin' on 'Sesame Street'". Spin. Spin Media. 2006-07-26. Retrieved 2009-06-27.^ "For The Record: Quick News On R. Kelly, Jamie Foxx, Green Day, Hilary Duff, Diddy, Tommy Lee & More". MTV. 2006-01-19. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ "John Legend and Carrie Underwood Set for All-Star Halftime Show". NBA. 2006-02-15. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ "Remembering Martin Luther King Jr. with John Legend". The Washington Post. 2008-04-04. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ Adler, Shawn (2008-02-28). "Andre 3000 Says He Didn't Even Try To Top Will Ferrell's Comic Chops On 'Semi-Pro' Set". MTV. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ "Artist of The Month: John Legend!".^ John Legend interview by Pete Lewis, 'Blues & Soul' October 2008. Bluesandsoul.com. Retrieved on 2011-05-26.^ [1][dead link]^ John Legend The Roots Collaborative Album Cover “Wake Up”. Hiphop.popcrunch.com (2010-07-19). Retrieved on 2011-05-26.^ Jayson Rodriguez, Tim Kash (May 6, 2010). "John Legend Is '99 Percent Done' With Wake Up Sessions Album". MTV. Retrieved May 12, 2010.^ John Legend & The Roots feat. Common & Melanie Fiona – Wake Up Everybody. Nah Right (2010-07-16). Retrieved on 2011-05-26.^ McGee, Tiffany. (2010-07-16) First Listen: John Legend & the Roots Want You to 'Wake Up!' – The Roots, Music News, John Legend. People.com. Retrieved on 2011-05-26.^ Interview, Youtube.com^ "Rap/R&B Music Video – T.I. feat John Legend – Slide Show". 2009-08-11. Retrieved 2009-08-15.^ "Musical performers announced for Major League Baseball All-Star Week". MLB. 2006-06-29. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ "Yes We Can — Barack Obama Music Video". YouTube. 2008-02-02. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ Haslett, Cassidy (2008-02-29). "WWE SmackDown! February 29, 2008 Results". Wrestling 101. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ Donahue, Ann (February 22, 2009). "'Slumdog' Sweeps Music Oscars". Billboard. Retrieved February 24, 2009.^ Kreps, Daniel (February 23, 2009). "Oscars: "Slumdog" Scores Best Picture and Music Category Sweep, Penn Wins Best Actor". Rolling Stone. Retrieved February 24, 2009.^ "Grammy-Winning Soul Musician John Legend at UPenn Commencement: "A Commitment to Truth Requires a Commitment to Social Justice"". Democracy Now!. 2009-05-19. Retrieved 2009-05-19.^ "The Show Me Campaign". The Show Me Campaign. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ "John Legend home for Christmas concert". USA Today. 2007-12-25. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ Daily News (New York). http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2009/06/22/2009-06-22_singer_gives_soul_to_help_battle_aids.html.^ Jocelyn Vena, "'Hope For Haiti Now' Telethon Airs Tonight At 8 P.M.: George Clooney, Wyclef Jean and Hollywood's biggest names help raise money for earthquake relief." MTV News, January 22, 2010, found at MTV News. Accessed January 22, 2010.^ "John Legend Joins Teach For America's National Board", TeachForAmerica.org, 2010-09-28.^ www.colbertnation.com. www.colbertnation.com (2011-05-19). Retrieved on 2011-05-26.^ Houston, Ryan (2008-04-15). "A Penn Legend serenades campus". The Daily Pennsylvanian. Retrieved 2008-05-13.^ "Official Site=Ticket Announcement". John Legend Network. 2008-07-16. Retrieved 2008-07-16.[edit] External linksWikimedia Commons has media related to: John LegendOfficial websiteJohn Legend – The Artists Organization – ManagementJohn Legend at the Internet Movie DatabaseJohn Legend in-depth interview by Pete Lewis, 'Blues & Soul' October 2010http://articles.latimes.com/2009/dec/12/entertainment/la-et-people-speak12-2009dec12The People Speak at the Internet Movie DatabaseAwardsPreceded by

Maroon 5Grammy Award for Best New Artist

2006Succeeded by

Carrie Underwood[show]v · d · eJohn Legend[show]v · d · eGrammy Award for Best New Artist[show]v · d · eGOOD Music‹ The template below (Time 100s 2000s) is being considered for deletion. See templates for discussion to help reach a consensus.›[show]v · d · eTime 100 selections (2000s)


SADE

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Sade Adu From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia SadeBirth nameHelen Folasade AduBorn16 January 1959 (age 52)

Ibadan, Oyo State, NigeriaGenresSmooth jazz, soul, jazz, R&B, quiet storm, soft rock, adult contemporaryOccupationsSinger-songwriter, composer, arranger, record producerYears active1980–presentLabelsPortrait/CBS Records

Epic/SME RecordsAssociated actsSadeWebsitewww.sade.comHelen Folasade Adu OBE (born 16 January 1959; better known as Sade), is a British singer-songwriter, composer, and record producer. She first achieved success in the 1980s as the frontwoman and lead vocalist of the Brit and Grammy Award winning English group Sade.

Contents [hide]1 Biography2 Personal life3 Discography3.1 Sade3.2 Collaboration4 References5 External links[edit] BiographySade was born in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.[1] Her middle name, Folasade, means honor confers your crown.[2] Her parents, Abedisi Adu, a Nigerian lecturer in economics of Yoruba background, and Anne Hayes, an English district nurse, met in London, married in 1955 and moved to Nigeria.[1] Later, when the marriage ran into difficulties, Anne Hayes returned to England, taking four-year-old [3] Sade and her older brother Banji to live with her parents.[1] When Sade was 11, she moved to Holland-on-Sea to live with her mother,[4] and after completing school at 18 she moved to London and studied at the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design.[1]

While at college, she joined a soul band, Pride, in which she sang backing vocals.[1] Her solo performances of the song "Smooth Operator" attracted the attention of record companies and in 1983, she signed a solo deal with Epic Records taking three members of the band, Stuart Matthewman, Andrew Hale and Paul Denman, with her.[1] Sade and her band produced the first of a string of hit albums. Their debut album Diamond Life was in 1984. She is the most successful solo female artist in British history, having sold over 110 million albums worldwide.[1]

In 2002, she appeared on the Red Hot Organization's Red Hot and Riot, a compilation CD in tribute to the music of fellow Nigerian musician, Fela Kuti. She recorded a remix of her hit single, "By Your Side", for the album and was billed as a co-producer.

[edit] Personal lifeIn 1989, she married Spanish film director Carlos Pliego. Their marriage ended in 1995.[1] She gave birth to a daughter, Ila Adu, in 1996 after a relationship with a Jamaican musician.[1]

Adu currently resides in Stroud, United Kingdom, with her partner Ian, his son Jack and her daughter Ila. She keeps her personal life private.

In 2002, she was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire for services to popular music.[5] Prior to the release of Soldier of Love in 2010, the Daily Mail described her as "famously reclusive".[6]

[edit] Discography[edit] SadeFor more details on this topic, see Discography of SadeStudio albums1984: Diamond Life1985: Promise1988: Stronger Than Pride1992: Love Deluxe2000: Lovers Rock2010: Soldier of LoveOther albums1992: Remix Deluxe1994: The Best of Sade2002: Lovers Live2011: The Ultimate Collection[edit] CollaborationAbsolute Beginners OST (Virgin, 1986)[edit] References^ a b c d e f g h i Sandall, Robert (31 January 2010). "Sade emerges from her country retreat". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 31 January 2010.^ Meaning of Folasade in Nigerian.name^ Sade.com^ Jessica Berer (May 1985). Sade. Spin. pp. 12. Retrieved 2010-08-21.^ New Year’s Honours List — United Kingdom - Official announcement in The London Gazette, 31 December 2001, Supplement No.1 S9^ Georgina Littlejohn (2010-03-13). "Sade displays her youthful looks as she dresses down after her glamorous magazine cover hits the shelves". Daily Mail. Retrieved 2010-03-13.[edit] External linksOfficial websiteSade discography at MusicBrainzSade at the Internet Movie DatabaseSade at Allmusic[hide]v · d · eSade

Sade Adu · Stuart Matthewman · Paul Spencer Denman · Andrew Hale · Paul Anthony Cook

Studio albumsDiamond Life · Promise · Stronger Than Pride · Love Deluxe · Lovers Rock · Soldier of Love

Other albumsRemix Deluxe · The Best of Sade · Lovers Live · The Ultimate Collection

Singles"Your Love Is King" · "When Am I Going to Make a Living" · "Hang on to Your Love" · "Smooth Operator" · "The Sweetest Taboo" · " Never as Good as the First Time" · "Is It a Crime" · "Love Is Stronger Than Pride" · "Paradise" · "Nothing Can Come Between Us" · "Turn My Back on You" · "No Ordinary Love" · "Feel No Pain" · "Kiss of Life" · "Cherish the Day" · "Pearls" · "By Your Side" · "King of Sorrow" · "Lovers Rock" · "Somebody Already Broke My Heart" (Live) · "Soldier of Love" · "Babyfather" · "The Moon and the Sky" · "Still in Love with You"

Concert tours1984 Tour (1984) · Promise Tour (1985-86) · Sade in Concert (1988-89) · Love Deluxe World Tour (1993-94) · Lovers Live Tour (2001) · Sade Live (2011)

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Tracee Ellis Ross

Posted by The Ricky Bear Company, Inc. on July 15, 2011 at 10:32 PM Comments comments (0)

Tracee Ellis RossFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search For the soap opera actress and Star Search winner, see Tracey Ross.Tracee Ellis Ross

Tracee Ellis Ross at the 2007 Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week (Photograph by Christopher Peterson)BornTracee Joy Silberstein

October 29, 1972 (1972-10-29) (age 38)

Los Angeles, California, U.S.Other namesTracee Ellie RossOccupationActressYears active1996–presentWebsitehttp://www.traceeellisross.com/Tracee Ellis Ross (born October 29, 1972) is an American actress.[1] She is best known for her lead role on the UPN/CW series, Girlfriends.

Contents [hide]1 Early life2 Career3 Filmography4 Awards and nominations5 References6 External links[edit] Early lifeBorn Tracee Joy Silberstein in Los Angeles, California, she is the daughter of singer/actress Diana Ross and music business manager Robert Ellis Silberstein. Actor and musician Evan Ross is her brother.[2] Ross attended the Dalton School in Manhattan and the Institut Le Rosey in Switzerland. She was a model in her teens.

She attended Brown University where she appeared in plays, and graduated in 1994 with a theatre degree. She later worked in the fashion industry, as a model and contributing fashion editor to Mirabella and New York magazine.[3]

[edit] CareerRoss made her big screen debut in 1996, playing a Jewish/African-American woman in the independent feature film Far Harbor. The following year, she debuted as host of The Dish, a Lifetime TV magazine series keeping tabs on popular culture. In 1998, she starred as a former high school track star who remained silent about having been abused at the hands of a coach, in the NBC made-for-TV movie: Race Against Fear: A Moment of Truth.[4] Her next role was an independent feature film Sue. In 2000, she landed her first major studio role in Diane Keaton's Hanging Up. The same year, she broke into comedy as a regular performer in the MTV series The Lyricist Lounge Show, a hip-hop variety series mixing music, dramatic sketches, and comedic skits.[5]

Ross' biggest career achievement came when she landed the role of Joan Carol Clayton — a successful (and often neurotic) lawyer looking for love, challenges, and adventure, in the hit UPN/CW series Girlfriends. The series centers on four young African-American women.[6] In 2007, Ross won an NAACP Image Award in the category, Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series for her role on the series. She won a second Image Award for the role in 2009.[7]

In 2007, Ross starred with her brother Evan Ross and Queen Latifah in the HBO movie Life Support,[8] That same year, she appeared in the Tyler Perry theatrical movie, Daddy's Little Girls.[9] She appeared in the 2009 film Labor Pains.[10] In 2010, she appeared in an episode of Private Practice as a pregnant doctor.[11] In 2011, Ross appeared in two episodes of CSI as the estranged wife of Laurence Fishburne's character.[12][13] Ross is scheduled to star in a new show read between the lines with Macolm Jamal Warner airing on BET starting in October 2011.

[edit] Filmography Ross in June 2006FilmYearFilmRoleNotes1996Far HarborKikiCredited as Tracee Ellie Ross1997SueLindaAlternative title: Sue lost in Manhattan1998A Fare to Remember

 

2000Hanging UpKim

In the WeedsCaroline

2006I-See-You.ComNancy Tanaka

2007Daddy's Little GirlsCynthia

2009Labor PainsKristin

TelevisionYearTitleRoleNotes1997The DishHostUnknown episodes1998Broken Silence: A Moment of Truth Movie"Kaycee KingTelevision movie2000The Lyricist Lounge ShowVarious rolesUnknown episodes2000–2008GirlfriendsJoan Clayton172 episodes2004Second Time AroundNaomi1 episode2007Life SupportTanyaTelevision movie2010Private PracticeEllenEpisode: "War"2011CSI: Crime Scene InvestigationGloria ParkesEpisodes: "All That Cremains"; "Father of the Bride"; "Cello and Goodbye"; "In a Dark, Dark House"[edit] Awards and nominationsYearAwardResultCategorySeries2003Prism AwardsNominatedPerformance in a Comedy SeriesGirlfriends2004BET Comedy AwardsNominatedOutstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy SeriesGirlfriends2005WonOutstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series2002NAACP Image AwardsNominatedOutstanding Actress in a Comedy SeriesGirlfriends20032004200520062007Won2008NominatedOutstanding Actress in a Comedy Series2009NominatedOutstanding Directing in a Comedy Series

(For episode "What's Black-A-Lackin")WonOutstanding Actress in a Comedy Series[edit] References^ Sweet, Lynn (2011-03-28). "Michelle Obama books stars to mentor: Hilary Swank, Geena Davis, Anna Deavere Smith, Michelle Kwan - Lynn Sweet". Blogs.suntimes.com. http://blogs.suntimes.com/sweet/2011/03/michelle_obama_books_stars_for.html. Retrieved 2011-04-08. ^ "Diana Ross opens up on 'Oprah' show | detnews.com | The Detroit News". detnews.com. http://www.detnews.com/article/20110225/ENT09/102250436/1361/Diana-Ross-opens-up-on-%E2%80%98Oprah%E2%80%99-show. Retrieved 2011-04-08. ^ Christian, Margena A. (2006-04-17). "Tracee Ellis Ross: 'Girlfriends' TV star takes center stage her way". Jet. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1355/is_15_109/ai_n26695537?tag=content;col1. Retrieved 2009-02-19. ^ Associated Press (8 September 1998). "Ross' daughter still auditions". Rochester Sentinel. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=QttgAAAAIBAJ&sjid=n3INAAAAIBAJ&pg=6255,375290&dq=tracee-ellis-ross&hl=en. Retrieved 8 April 2011. ^ "UPN'S GIRLFRIENDS TRIES TO SURVIVE". South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Feb 25, 2001. ^ "CW's 'Girlfriends' to End After 8 Years - Celebrity Gossip | Entertainment News | Arts And Entertainment". FOXNews.com. 2008-02-14. http://www.foxnews.com/wires/2008Feb14/0,4670,TVGirlfriends,00.html. Retrieved 2011-04-08. ^ Hite, N'Neka (2009-02-12). "'Bees' big at NAACP Image Awards". variety.com. http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118000120.html?categoryid=2098&cs=1&query=tracee+ellis+ross. Retrieved 2009-02-19. ^ Hale, Mike (March 4, 2007). "The Week Ahead: March 4 - 10 > Television". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/04/arts/04weekahead.html. Retrieved 8 April 2011. ^ "Tyler Perry's Daddy's Little Girls Movie Review - Tyler Perry's Daddy's Little Girls Movie Trailer - The Boston Globe". Boston.com. 2007-02-15. http://www.boston.com/movies/display?display=movie&id=9467. Retrieved 2011-04-08. ^ Retrieved 2009-04-02^ "Private Practice: War Episode Summary on". Tv.com. 2011-02-27. http://www.tv.com/private-practice/war/episode/1338586/summary.html. Retrieved 2011-04-08. ^ "CSI “All That Cremains” Season 11 Episode 14 Photos With Tracee Ellis Ross | Daemon's TV". Daemonstv.com. 2011-01-28. http://www.daemonstv.com/2011/01/28/csi-all-that-cremains-season-11-episode-14-photos-with-tracee-ellis-ross/. Retrieved 2011-04-08. ^ "CSI – LOST’S L. Scott Caldwell to Guest Star". Bscreview.com. http://www.bscreview.com/2011/04/csi-losts-l-scott-caldwell-to-guest-star/. Retrieved 2011-04-08. [edit] External linksOfficial WebsiteTracee Ellis Ross cast bio on The CWTracee Ellis Ross's biography on filmbugTracee Ellis Ross at the Internet Movie DatabasePersondataNameRoss, Tracee EllisAlternative namesSilberstein, Tracee Joy; Ross, Tracee EllieShort descriptionActressDate of birthOctober 29, 1972Place of birthLos Angeles, CaliforniaDate of deathPlace of deathRetrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracee_Ellis_Ross"Categories: 1972 births | Actors from Los Angeles, California | African American actors | American film actors | American people of Native American descent | American television actors | Brown University alumni | Living people | People from Los Angeles, California | RoseensHidden categories: Articles with hCardsPersonal toolsLog in / create accountNamespacesArticleDiscussionVariantsViewsReadEditView historyActionsSearch NavigationMain pageContentsFeatured contentCurrent eventsRandom articleDonate to WikipediaInteractionHelpAbout WikipediaCommunity portalRecent changesContact WikipediaToolboxWhat links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkCite this pagePrint/exportCreate a bookDownload as PDFPrintable versionLanguagesDeutschThis page was last modified on 14 July 2011 at 16:28.

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Great Dane

Posted by The Ricky Bear Company, Inc. on June 27, 2011 at 7:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Great Dane

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For other uses, see The Great Dane (disambiguation).

Great Dane

A Harlequin Great Dane

Other names Grand Danois (18th Cent. French: 'Great Dane' the modern French is Dogue Allemand ("German Mastiff").

Deutsche Dogge ('German Mastiff')

Dänische Dogge ('Danish Mastiff')[1]

Nicknames Dane

Gentle Giant

Country of origin Denmark/Germany

[hide]Traits

[show]Classification and standards

Dog (Canis lupus familiaris)

The Great Dane (18th Cent. French: Grand Danois), also known as German Mastiff (German: Deutsche Dogge) or Danish Hound (German: Dänischer Hund), is a breed of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) known for its giant size.[2] The Great Dane is one of the world's tallest dog breeds; the current world record holder, measuring 109 cm (43 in) from paw to shoulder; 220 cm (7.2 ft) from head to tail, is George.[3]

Contents

[hide]

1 Description

1.1 Appearance

1.1.1 Coat colors

1.2 Temperament

2 Exercise

3 Health

4 History

5 Great Danes in popular culture

6 See also

7 References

8 External links

[edit] Description

[edit] Appearance

Great Danes of several coat types, from left to right: harlequin, black, brindle, blue and fawn

As described by the American Kennel Club, "The Great Dane combines, in its regal appearance, dignity, strength and elegance with great size and a powerful, well-formed, smoothly muscled body. It is one of the giant working breeds, but is unique in that its general conformation must be so well balanced that it never appears clumsy, and shall move with a long reach and powerful drive."[4] The Great Dane is a short haired breed with a strong galloping figure.[5] In the ratio between length and height, the Great Dane should be square. The male dog should not be less than 30 in (76 cm) at the shoulders, a female 28 in (71 cm). Danes under minimum height are disqualified.[4]

From year to year, the tallest living dog is typically a Great Dane. Previous record holders include Gibson and Titan, however the current record holder is a blue Great Dane named Giant George who stands 43 in (110 cm) at the shoulder.[6] He is also the tallest dog on record (according Guinness World Records),[6] beating the previous holder who was a brindle Great Dane named Shamgret Danzas, who stood 42.5 in (108 cm) at the shoulder.

The minimum weight for a Great Dane over eighteen months is 120 lb (54 kg) for males, 100 lb (45 kg) for females.[5][7] Unusually, the American Kennel Club dropped the minimum weight requirement from its standard.[8] The male should appear more massive throughout than the female, with a larger frame and heavier bone.[4]

Great Danes have naturally floppy, triangular ears. In the past, when Great Danes were commonly used to hunt boars, cropping of the ears was performed to make injuries to the dogs' ears less likely during hunts. Now that Danes are primarily companion animals, cropping is sometimes still done for traditional and cosmetic reasons. Today, the practice is somewhat common in the United States and much less common in Europe. In some European countries such as the United Kingdom, Ireland, Denmark, Germany, parts of Australia, and in New Zealand, the practice is banned, or controlled to only be performed by veterinary surgeons.

[edit] Coat colors

Blue puppy

A 5 month-old Harlequin Great Dane puppy.

There are six show-acceptable coat colors for Great Danes:[4]

Fawn: The color is yellow gold with a black mask. Black should appear on the eye rims and eyebrows, and may appear on the ears.

Brindle: The color is fawn and black in a chevron stripe pattern. Often also they are referred to as having a tiger-stripe pattern.

Blue: The color is a pure steel blue. White markings at the chest and toes are not desirable and considered faults.

Black: The color is a glossy black. White markings at the chest and toes are not desirable and considered faults.

Harlequin: The base color is pure white with black torn patches irregularly and well distributed over the entire body; a pure white neck is preferred. The black patches should never be large enough to give the appearance of a blanket, nor so small as to give a stippled or dappled effect. Eligible, but less desirable, are a few small grey patches (this grey is consistent with a Merle marking) or a white base with single black hairs showing through, which tend to give a salt and pepper or dirty effect. (Have the same link to deafness and blindness as Merle and white danes.)

Mantle (in some countries referred to as Bostons due to the similar coloration and pattern as a Boston Terrier): The color is black and white with a solid black blanket extending over the body; black skull with white muzzle; white blaze is optional; whole white collar preferred; a white chest; white on part or whole of forelegs and hind legs; white tipped black tail. A small white marking in the black blanket is acceptable, as is a break in the white collar

Fawnquin (fawn with white spots or white with fawn spots) colors occur occasionally but are not acceptable for conformation showing, and they are not pursued by breeders who intend to breed show dogs. These colors include white, fawnquin, merle, merlequin, fawn mantle, and others. Some breeders may attempt to charge more for puppies of these "rare" colors. However, the breeding of white and merle Danes is particularly controversial, as these colors may be associated with genes that produce deafness. Although they cannot be shown, white or merle Danes can usually still be registered as pedigree dogs.

[edit] Temperament

The Great Dane's large and imposing appearance belies its friendly nature; the breed is often referred to as a gentle giant.[4] Great Danes are generally well-disposed toward other dogs, other non-canine pets and humans, although, when feeling threatened, have been known to attack humans. This is usually brought on by a person that is unfamiliar to the dog. Some breeds may chase or attack small animals, but this is not typical with Great Danes.[9]

[edit] Exercise

Like most dogs, Great Danes require daily walks to remain healthy. However it is important not to over exercise this breed, particularly when young. Great Dane puppies grow very large, very fast, which puts them at risk of joint and bone problems. Because of a puppy's natural energy, Dane owners often take steps to minimize activity while the dog is still growing.[10][11]

Given their large size, Great Danes continue to grow (mostly gaining weight) longer than most dogs. Even at one year of age a Great Dane will continue to grow for several more months.[12]

An example of a Merle Great Dane, A.K.C. recognized but not a show dog

[edit] Health

Great Danes, like most giant dogs, have a fairly slow metabolism. This results in less energy and less food consumption per pound of dog than in small breeds. Great Danes have some health problems that are common to large breeds, including gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) (a painful distending and twisting of the stomach). This is a critical condition that can affect Great Danes and other deep-chested breeds, and which may cause death if not quickly addressed. Drinking large amounts of fluid in a short period of time can provoke GDV in Great Danes, as well as other larger breeds of dogs. It is a commonly recommended practice for Great Danes to have their stomachs tacked (Gastropexy) to the right abdominal wall if the dog or its relatives have a history of GDV, though some veterinary surgeons will not do the operation if the actual sickness has not occurred. Elevated food dishes are often believed to help prevent GDV by regulating the amount of air that is inhaled while eating, although one study suggests that they may increase the risk.[13] Refraining from exercise or activity immediately before and after meals may also reduce risk, although this has not been validated with research. Signs that GDV may have occurred include, but are not limited to, visible distension (enlargement of the abdomen) and repeated retching that resembles repetitive non-productive attempts to vomit. GDV is a condition that is distinct from another condition referred to as bloat; though, bloat may precede the development of GDV. GDV is a surgical emergency; immediate veterinary evaluation should be sought if a dog demonstrates signs of this condition.

Breed clubs health surveys in the UK and US put the average life span of Great Danes at 6.5 to 7 years.[14][15]

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and many congenital heart diseases are also commonly found in the Great Dane, leading to its nickname of the Heartbreak breed, in conjunction with its shorter lifespan. Great Danes also suffer from several genetic disorders that are specific to the breed. For example, if a Great Dane lacks color (is white) near its eyes or ears then that organ does not develop and usually the dog will be either blind, deaf, or both.[16]

[edit] History

According to Barbara Stein, "The breed originated in Germany, probably from a cross between the English mastiff and the Grey Hound.[17] However, other sources maintain that the breed originated in[unreliable source?][18] and still others report the question as controversial and unsettled.[19] In 1749 Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon[20] used the name "le Grand Danois," (translated by William Smellie as "Great Dane"). Up until that time the hound was referred to in England as "Danish dog."[21] According to Jacob Nicolay Wilse the Danes called the dog "large hound," a terminology continued well in to the 20th century.[22] As late as in the 1780 Germany the hound is referred to as "Grosser Dänischer Jagdhund" (English: Large Danish Hunting Hound).[23] At the first dog exhibition, held in Hamburg 14–20 July 1863, eight dogs were called "Dänische Dogge" and seven "Ulmer Doggen."[24]

The Great Dane Raro, Denmark 1655

[edit] Great Danes in popular culture

The Great Dane was named the state dog of Pennsylvania in 1965.[25]

Scooby-Doo, the famous Hanna-Barbera character, was based on a Great Dane by animation designer Iwao Takamoto. Takamoto based his illustrations on sketches given to him by a Hanna-Barbera employee who bred this dog. Scooby closely resembles a Great Dane, although his tail is longer than the breed's, bearing closer resemblance to a cat's tail.[26][27]

The athletic teams of the University at Albany have been known as the Great Danes since 1965. Damien The Great Dane has been the mascot since that time; In 2003, the school added Lil' D, a smaller Great Dane, to help Damien entertain the crowds.

Brutus in The Ugly Dachshund, a Great Dane raised by a Dachshund mother.

Marmaduke is a newspaper comic strip drawn by Brad Anderson from 1954 to the present day. The strip revolves around the Winslow family and their Great Dane, Marmaduke.

In The Guardian (novel) by Nicholas Sparks the main but tragic hero is Singer, a Great Dane, acting as the guardian of a true love.

Elmer, a great dane in Oswald the Lucky Rabbit by Walter Lantz

In each film version of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Hound of the Baskervilles", the Great Dane was used to play as the cursed hellhound that kills the Baskerville family.

Great Dane is popular in South India when the film "Basha" by Super Star Rajnikanth appeared with this breed and his still photo with a black Great Dane has served much advertisement for the said movie.

Harlequin Great Danes can be seen in several Lady Gaga music videos such as "Poker Face".

The SHAYTARDS have a Great Dane named Malichi.

Astro from The Jetsons is a gray Great Dane.

[edit] See also

Argentine Dogo

[edit] References

^ "Es war ein reizender Abend," short story by Erich Kästner.

^ Becker,The Great Dane - Embodying a Full Exposition of the History, Breeding Principles, Education, and Present State of the Breed (a Vintage Dog Books Breed Classic): Embodying a Full Exposition the History, Breeding Principles, Education, and Present State of the Breed, Published by READ BOOKS, 2005, ISBN 1-905124-43-0.

^ Jones, Sam (22 February 2010) Giant George takes crown as the world's tallest dog, The Guardian

^ a b c d e "Great Dane Breed Standard". American Kennel Club. 1999.

^ a b "UK Kennel Club Breed Standard"

^ a b "Guinness: Arizona Great Dane is tallest dog ever". Washington Post. 22 February 2010. Retrieved 23 February 2010.[dead link]

^ "New Zealand Kennel Club standard"

^ Cunliffe, Juliette (2005). The Complete Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds. UK: Parragon Publishing. ISBN 1-40544-389-8.

^ Great Dane: A Comprehensive Guide to Owning and Caring for Your Dog, Kennel Club Book, 2003, ISBN 1-59378-273-X

^ "The Great Dane Adoption Society, Care Advice"

^ "All about Great Danes.com Exercise advice"

^ [1]

^ Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Non-dietary risk factors for gastric dilatation-volvulus in large and giant breed dogs

^ "Summary results of the Purebred Dog Health Survey for Great Danes". Kennel Club/British Small Animal Veterinary Association Scientific Committee. 2004. Retrieved 29 March 2010.

^ "National Health Survey". Great Dane Club of America. 2004. Retrieved 29 March 2010.

^ "Great Dane rescue a labor of love", by Tamara Phillips, March 23, 2008, Daytona Beach News-Journal.

^ Collier's Encyclopedia, 1993, sv Great Dane

^ "The Great Dane – A Danish Cultural Heritage." Great Danes: House of Apollon.

^ animal-world.com/

^ "Histoire Naturelle, générale et particulière"

^ "Canine Madness", 1762).

^ "Fuldstændig beskrivelse af stapelstaden Fridericia – efter pålidelige underretninger og egne undersøgninger." 1767, p176

^ Edward C. Ash : Practical Dog Book, 1931, "The Great Dane"

^ Bulletin Officiel de la Société Canine de Monaco, August 1938

^ State Symbols USA, www.statesymbolsusa.org

^ "Iwao Takamoto, 81, the Animation Artist Who Created Scooby-Doo, Dies", by Susan Stewart, January 10, 2007, The New York Times

^ "Iwao Takamoto, cartoonist who created Scooby-Doo, dies at 81", The Associated Press, January 9, 2007, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

About Daniel Day-Lewis

Posted by The Ricky Bear Company, Inc. on May 5, 2011 at 8:46 PM Comments comments (0)

Daniel Day-LewisFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

 A smiling man wearing a gray hat with piping above the band, and a tan Western style shirt, stands in an office, posing for the camera.

Daniel Day-Lewis

Day-Lewis in New York, 2007

Born Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis

29 April 1957 (1957-04-29) (age 54)

Greenwich, London, England, United Kingdom

Nationality Irish/English

Occupation Actor

Years active 1971–present

Spouse Rebecca Miller (1996–present)

Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an English actor with both British and Irish citizenship.[1] His portrayals of Christy Brown in My Left Foot (1989) and Daniel Plainview in There Will Be Blood (2007) won Academy and BAFTA Awards for Best Actor, and Screen Actors Guild as well as Golden Globe Awards for There Will Be Blood. His role as Bill "The Butcher" Cutting in Gangs of New York (2002) earned him the BAFTA Award and a Screen Actors Guild Award.

Day-Lewis, who grew up in London, is the son of actress Jill Balcon and the Anglo-Irish Poet Laureate, Cecil Day-Lewis. He is a method actor, known for his constant devotion to and research of his roles.[2] Often, he will remain completely in character for the duration of the shooting schedule of his films, even to the point of adversely affecting his health.[3] He is known as one of the most selective actors in the film industry, having starred in only five films since 1997,[3] with as many as five years between roles.[2]

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Career

2.1 1980s

2.2 1990s

2.3 2000s

3 Personal life

4 Filmography

5 See also

6 References

7 External links

 

[edit] Early lifeDay-Lewis was born in London, the son of English actor Jill Balcon and Anglo-Irish poet Cecil Day-Lewis, who had lived mainly in England from the age of two and later became the United Kingdom's Poet Laureate. His mother's family was Jewish and originated in the Baltics. His maternal grandfather, Sir Michael Balcon, was the head of Ealing Studios.[4][5] Two years after his birth, the family moved to Croom's Hill, Greenwich, where Day-Lewis grew up along with his older sister, Tamasin Day-Lewis, who became a documentary filmmaker and television chef.[6]

Living in middle-class Greenwich, Day-Lewis found himself among tough South London kids, and, being part Jewish and posh, he was often bullied.[7] He mastered the local accent and mannerisms and credits that with being his first convincing performances.[7][8] Later in life, he was known to speak of himself as very much a disorderly character in his younger years, often in trouble for shoplifting and other petty crimes.[8][9]

In 1968, Day-Lewis's parents, finding his behaviour to be too wild, sent him to the independent Sevenoaks School in Kent, as a boarder.[9] Though he detested the school, he was introduced to his three most prominent interests, woodworking, acting and fishing. His disdain for the school grew, and after two years at Sevenoaks, he was transferred to another independent school, Bedales in Petersfield, which his sister attended, and which had a more relaxed and creative ethos.[9] This transfer led to his film debut at the age of 14 in Sunday Bloody Sunday in which he played a vandal in an uncredited role. He described the experience as "heaven", for getting paid £2 to vandalize expensive cars parked outside his local church.[6]

Leaving Bedales in 1975, his unruly attitude had faded and he needed to make a career choice. Although he had excelled onstage at the National Youth Theatre, he decided to become a cabinet-maker, applying for a five-year apprenticeship. However, because of a lack of experience, he was not accepted.[9] He then applied (and was accepted) at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, which he attended for three years, eventually performing at the Bristol Old Vic itself.[9] At one point he played understudy to Pete Postlethwaite, opposite whom he would later play in In the Name of the Father, and with whom he shares a brief scene in Last of the Mohicans, where Postlethwaite is a British officer.[10]

[edit] Career[edit] 1980sDuring the early '80s, Day-Lewis worked in theatre and television including Frost in May (where he played an impotent man-child) and How Many Miles to Babylon? (as a World War I[11] officer torn between allegiances to Britain and Ireland) for the BBC. Eleven years after his film debut, Day-Lewis continued his film career with a small part in Gandhi (1982) as Colin, a street thug who bullies the title character, only to be immediately chastised by his high-strung mother. In late 1982 he had his big theatre break when he took over the lead in Another Country. The following year, he had a supporting role as the conflicted, but ultimately loyal first mate in The Bounty, after which he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company, playing Romeo in Romeo and Juliet and Flute in A Midsummer Night's Dream.[9]

Next he played a gay man in an interracial relationship in the film My Beautiful Laundrette. Day-Lewis gained further public notice with A Room with a View (1986), in which he portrayed an entirely different character: Cecil Vyse, the effete upper-class fiancé of the main character (played by Helena Bonham Carter).[12]

In 1987, Day-Lewis assumed leading-man status by starring in Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being, co-starring Lena Olin and Juliette Binoche, as a Czech doctor whose hyperactive and purely physical sex life is thrown into disarray when he allows himself to become emotionally involved with a woman. During the eight-month shoot he learned Czech and first began to refuse to break character on or off the set for the entire shooting schedule.[9]

Day-Lewis put his personal version of "method acting" into full use in 1989 with his performance as Christy Brown in Jim Sheridan's My Left Foot which won him numerous awards, including the Academy Award for Best Actor. During filming, his eccentricities came to the fore, due to his refusal to break character.[9] Playing a severely paralyzed character on screen, off screen Day-Lewis had to be moved around the set in his wheelchair, and crew members would curse at having to lift him over camera and lighting wires, all so that he might gain insight into all aspects of Brown's life, including the embarrassments.[8] He broke two ribs during filming from assuming a hunched-over position in his wheelchair for so many weeks.[13]

Day-Lewis returned to the stage in 1989 to work with Richard Eyre, in Hamlet at the National Theatre, but collapsed in the middle of a scene where the ghost of Hamlet's father first appears to his son.[9] He began sobbing uncontrollably and refused to go back on stage;[14] he was replaced by Ian Charleson before a then-unknown Jeremy Northam finished what little was left of the production's run. Although the incident was officially attributed to exhaustion, one rumour following the incident was that Day-Lewis had seen the ghost of his own father.[9][15] He confirmed on the British celebrity chat show Parkinson, that this rumour was true.[16] He has not appeared on stage since.[16]

[edit] 1990sIn 1992, three years after his Oscar win, The Last of the Mohicans was released. Day-Lewis's character research for this film was well-publicized; he reportedly underwent rigorous weight training and learned to live off the land and forest where his character lived, camping, hunting and fishing.[9] He even carried a long rifle at all times during filming in order to remain in character and learned how to skin animals.[9][17]

He returned to work with Jim Sheridan on In the Name of the Father, in which he played Gerry Conlon, one of the Guildford Four who were wrongfully convicted of a bombing carried out by the Provisional IRA. He lost a substantial amount of weight for the part, kept his Northern Irish accent on and off the set for the entire shooting schedule, and spent stretches of time in a prison cell.[17] He also insisted that crew members throw cold water at him and verbally abuse him.[17] The film earned him his second Academy Award nomination, his third BAFTA nomination, and his second Golden Globe nomination.

Day-Lewis returned in 1993, playing Newland Archer in Martin Scorsese's adaptation of the Edith Wharton novel The Age of Innocence, opposite Winona Ryder and Michelle Pfeiffer. To prepare for the film, set in America's Gilded Age, he wore 1870s-period aristocratic clothing around New York City for two months, including top hat, cane and cape during colder periods.[18]

In 1996, Day-Lewis starred in a film version of The Crucible, the play by Arthur Miller, again opposite Winona Ryder. He followed that with Jim Sheridan's The Boxer as a former boxer and IRA member recently released from prison. His preparation included training with former boxing world champion Barry McGuigan.[19]

Following The Boxer, Day-Lewis took a leave of absence from acting by putting himself into "semi-retirement" and returning to his old passion of woodworking.[19] He moved to Florence, Italy, where he became intrigued by the craft of shoemaking, eventually apprenticing as a shoemaker.[9] For a time his exact whereabouts and actions were not made publicly known.[20] Day-Lewis has declined to discuss this period of his life, stating that "it was a period of my life that I had a right to without any intervention of that kind."[1]

[edit] 2000sAfter a five-year absence from filming, Day-Lewis returned to act in multiple Academy Award-nominated films such as Gangs of New York, a film directed by Martin Scorsese (with whom he had worked on The Age of Innocence) and produced by Harvey Weinstein. In his role as the villain gang leader "Bill the Butcher", he starred along with Leonardo DiCaprio, who played Bill's young protegé. He began his lengthy, self-disciplined process by taking lessons as an apprentice butcher, and while filming, he was never out of character between takes (including keeping his character's New York accent).[9] At one point during filming, having been diagnosed with pneumonia, he refused to wear a warmer coat or to take treatment because it was not in keeping with the period; however, he was eventually persuaded to seek medical treatment.[21] His performance in Gangs of New York earned him his third Academy Award nomination and won him the BAFTA Award for Best Actor.

After Gangs of New York, Day-Lewis's wife, director Rebecca Miller (daughter of playwright Arthur Miller), offered him the lead role in her film The Ballad of Jack and Rose, in which he played a dying man with regrets over how his life had evolved and over how he had raised his teenage daughter. During filming he arranged to live separately from his wife in order to achieve the "isolation" needed to focus on his own character's reality.[6] The film received mixed reviews.[22]

In 2007, Day-Lewis appeared in director Paul Thomas Anderson's loose adaptation of the Upton Sinclair novel Oil!, titled There Will Be Blood.[23] Day-Lewis received the Academy Award for Best Actor, BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role, Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama, Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role - Motion Picture (which he dedicated to Heath Ledger, saying that he was inspired by Ledger's acting and calling the actor's performance in Brokeback Mountain "unique, perfect"),[24][25] and a variety of film critics circle awards for the role.

In 2009, Day-Lewis starred in Rob Marshall's musical adaptation Nine as film director Guido Contini.[26] Day-Lewis was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy and the Satellite Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for his role, as well as sharing nominations for the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture and the Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast and the Satellite Award for Best Cast – Motion Picture with the rest of the cast members.

In November 2010, it was announced that Day-Lewis was cast in the main role in Steven Spielberg's upcoming biographical film about Abraham Lincoln.[27]

[edit] Personal lifeDay-Lewis rarely talks publicly about his personal life. He had a relationship with French actress Isabelle Adjani, which lasted six years and eventually ended after a split and reconciliation.[9][14] Their son Gabriel Day-Lewis was born in 1995 in New York, several months after the relationship between the two actors had ended. Gabriel now lives with him in Wicklow, attending St. Gerard's School.[14]

In 1996, while working on the film version of the stage-play The Crucible, he visited the home of playwright Arthur Miller where he was introduced to the writer's daughter, Rebecca Miller. They married later that year. The couple has two sons, Ronan Cal Day-Lewis (born 14 June 1998) and Cashel Blake Day-Lewis (born in May 2002) and divide their time between their homes in the U.S. and Ireland.[6] Day-Lewis currently holds dual British and Irish citizenship,[28][29] He became an Irish citizen in 1993.[30] He is a supporter of Millwall Football Club.[31] On 15 July 2010, he received an honorary doctorate in letters from the University of Bristol, in part because of his attendance at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School in his youth.[32] Day-Lewis is an agnostic.[33]

[edit] FilmographyYear Title Role Notes

1971 Sunday Bloody Sunday Child vandal Uncredited

1982 Gandhi Colin - South African Street Thug

1984 Bounty, TheThe Bounty John Fryer

1985 My Beautiful Laundrette Johnny National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actor (Also for A Room with a View)

New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor (Also for A Room with a View)

1985 Room with a View, AA Room with a View Cecil Vyse National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actor (Also for My Beautiful Laundrette)

New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor (Also for My Beautiful Laundrette)

1988 Unbearable Lightness of Being, TheThe Unbearable Lightness of Being Tomas

1988 Stars and Bars Henderson Dores

1989 Eversmile, New Jersey Dr. Fergus O'Connell

1989 My Left Foot Christy Brown Academy Award for Best Actor

BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actor

London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Montreal World Film Festival Award for Best Actor

Montreal World Film Festival - Prize of the Ecumenical Jury - Special Mention (Shared with Jim Sheridan)

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor

New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Nominated—European Film Award for Best Actor

Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

1992 Last of the Mohicans, TheThe Last of the Mohicans Hawkeye (Nathaniel Poe) Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actor

London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actor of the Year

Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

1993 Age of Innocence, TheThe Age of Innocence Newland Archer

1993 In the Name of the Father Gerry Conlon Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor

Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actor

Nominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

1996 Crucible, TheThe Crucible John Proctor

1997 Boxer, TheThe Boxer Danny Flynn Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

2002 Gangs of New York Bill 'The Butcher' Cutting BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor (Tied with Jack Nicholson for About Schmidt)

Central Ohio Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor (Tied with Jack Nicholson for About Schmidt)

New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

Russian Guild of Film Critics Award for Best Foreign Actor

San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

Satellite Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama (Tied with Michael Caine for The Quiet American)

Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role - Motion Picture

Seattle Film Critics Award for Best Actor

Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Vancouver Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Nominated—Academy Award for Best Actor

Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actor

Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Villain

Nominated—Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

2005 Ballad of Jack and Rose, TheThe Ballad of Jack and Rose Jack Slavin Marrakech International Film Festival Award for Best Actor

2007 There Will Be Blood Daniel Plainview Academy Award for Best Actor

Alliance of Women Film Journalists Award for Best Actor

Austin Film Critics Award for Best Actor

BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Central Ohio Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Chlotrudis Award for Best Actor

Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actor

Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

Houston Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

Irish Film Award for Best Actor

Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor

New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

Palm Springs International Film Festival - Desert Palm Achievement Award

Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actor

Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role - Motion Picture

St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Utah Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor

Vancouver Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor

Village Voice Film Poll - Best Actor

Nominated—Empire Award for Best Actor

Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Actor

2009 Nine Guido Contini Satellite Award for Best Cast – Motion Picture

Nominated—Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast

Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

Nominated—Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Ensemble

[edit] See alsoList of people on stamps of Ireland

[edit] References1.^ a b "Day Lewis, Daniel: Gangs Of New York" UrbanCinefile.com.au Accessed 11 October 2008

2.^ a b Parker, Emily. "Sojourner in Other Men's Souls". The Wall Street Journal. 23 January 2008.

3.^ a b Herschberg, Lynn. "The New Frontier's Man" New York Times Magazine, 11 November 2007

4.^ "Day-Lewis gets Oscar nod for new film". Kent News. 17 December 2007. http://www.kentnews.co.uk/kent-news/Day__Lewis-gets-Oscar-nod-for-new-film-newsinkent7935.aspx?news=local. Retrieved 9 January 2008.

5.^ Pearlman, Cindy (30 December 2007). "Day-Lewis isn't suffering: 'It's a joy'". Chicago Sun-Times. http://www.suntimes.com/entertainment/pearlman/718435,SHO-Sunday-lewis30.article. Retrieved 9 January 2008.

6.^ a b c d Segal, David. "Daniel Day-Lewis, Behaving Totally In Character" The Washington Post, 31 March 2005

7.^ a b Corliss, Richard and Carrie Ross Welch. "Dashing Daniel" Time, European Edition, 21 March 1994

8.^ a b c Jenkins, Garry. Daniel Day-Lewis: The Fires Within St. Martin's Press, 1994, ASIN B000R9II4O

9.^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Wills, Dominic, "Daniel Day-Lewis Biography" Tiscali UK Retrieved 25 February 2006

10.^ Wolf (1994-03-13). "FILM; Pete Postlethwaite Turns a Prison Stint Into Oscar Material first=Matt". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/1994/03/13/movies/film-pete-postlethwaite-turns-a-prison-stint-into-oscar-material.html?pagewanted=1. Retrieved 2009-01-06.

11.^ How Many Miles to Babylon? at the Internet Movie Database

12.^ "Daniel Day-Lewis". The Oscar Site. http://theoscarsite.com/whoswho7/daylewis_d.htm. Retrieved 2009-01-06.

13.^ An Inspirational Journey: The Making of My Left Foot DVD, Miramax Films, 2005

14.^ a b c Scott, Paul (2008-01-19). "The VERY strange life of reclusive superstar Daniel Day-Lewis". The Daily Mail. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-509161/The-VERY-strange-life-reclusive-superstar-Daniel-Day-Lewis.html. Retrieved 2010-01-07.

15.^ "Daniel Day-Lewis Q&A" TimeOut.com, 20 March 2006

16.^ a b Parkinson. 25 March 2006.

17.^ a b c "Daniel Day-Lewis". Turner Classic Movies. http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/participant.jsp?spid=45745. Retrieved 2010-01-07.

18.^ "Daniel Day-Lewis". Hello!. http://www.hellomagazine.com/profiles/daniel-day-lewis/. Retrieved 2010-01-07.

19.^ a b "Daniel Day-Lewis". AskMen. http://www.askmen.com/celebs/men/entertainment/daniel-day-lewis/index.html. Retrieved 2010-01-07.

20.^ New York Times Biography New York Times, Retrieved 27 February 2006

21.^ "Daniel Day-Lewis aims for perfection". The Daily Telegraph. 2008-02-22. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1579473/Daniel-Day-Lewis-aims-for-perfection.html. Retrieved 2010-01-01.

22.^ "The Ballad of Jack and Rose" RottenTomatoes.com, Accessed 12 October 2008

23.^ Fleming, Michael and Ian Mohr, There Will Be Blood announcement Variety, Retrieved 25 February 2006

24.^ Diluna, Amy; Joe Neumaier (2008-01-27). "Daniel Day-Lewis Honors Heath Ledger during Screen Actors Guild Awards". New York Daily News. http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/2008/01/27/2008-01-27_daniel_daylewis_honors_heath_ledger_duri.html. Retrieved 2008-02-16.

25.^ Elsworth, Catherine (2008-01-28). "Daniel Day Lewis, Julie Christie win at Screen Actors Guild Awards". The Daily Telegraph. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/3670802/Daniel-Day-Lewis-Julie-Christie-win-at-Screen-Actors-Guild-Awards.html. Retrieved 2009-12-03.

26.^ "Daniel Day-Lewis Signed for Nine Film" broadwayworld.com, 1 June 2008

27.^ Shoard, Catherine (2010-11-19). "Daniel Day-Lewis set for Steven Spielberg's Lincoln film". The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/nov/19/daniel-day-lewis-spielberg-lincoln. Retrieved 2010-11-20.

28.^ Devlin, Martina. "Daniel, old chap, sure you're one of our own" Independent.ie 24 January 2008

29.^ "Day-Lewis heads UK Oscars charge." BBC 22 January 2008

30.^ "Daniel Day-Lewis." RottenTomatoes.com, Accessed 12 October 2008

31.^ Sullivan, Chris (1 February 2008). "How Daniel Day-Lewis' notoriously rigorous role preparation has yielded another Oscar contender". London: Independent.co.uk. http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/how-daniel-daylewis-notoriously-rigorous-role-preparation-has-yielded-another-oscar-contender-776563.html. Retrieved 4 July 2010.

32.^ University of Bristol

33.^ [1]

[edit] External links Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Daniel Day-Lewis

Daniel Day-Lewis at the Internet Movie Database

LA Weekly interview with Lewis, 19 December 2007

Extensive Biography at Tiscali UK

Peter Stanford, The enigma of Day-Lewis, The Observer, 13 January 2008

[show] Awards for Daniel Day-Lewis

 

[show]v · d · eAcademy Award for Best Actor

 

Henry Fonda (1981) · Ben Kingsley (1982) · Robert Duvall (1983) · F. Murray Abraham (1984) · William Hurt (1985) · Paul Newman (1986) · Michael Douglas (1987) · Dustin Hoffman (1988) · Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) · Jeremy Irons (1990) · Anthony Hopkins (1991) · Al Pacino (1992) · Tom Hanks (1993) · Tom Hanks (1994) · Nicolas Cage (1995) · Geoffrey Rush (1996) · Jack Nicholson (1997) · Roberto Benigni (1998) · Kevin Spacey (1999) · Russell Crowe (2000)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Complete List · (1928–1940) · (1941–1960) · (1961–1980) · (1981–2000) · (2001–present)

 

 

[show]v · d · e Academy Award for Best Actor

 

Denzel Washington (2001) · Adrien Brody (2002) · Sean Penn (2003) · Jamie Foxx (2004) · Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) · Forest Whitaker (2006) · Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) · Sean Penn (2008) · Jeff Bridges (2009) · Colin Firth (2010)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Complete List · (1928–1940) · (1941–1960) · (1961–1980) · (1981–2000) · (2001–present)

 

 

[show]v · d · eBAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

 

John Hurt (1980) · Burt Lancaster (1981) · Ben Kingsley (1982) · Michael Caine / Dustin Hoffman (1983) · Haing S. Ngor (1984) · William Hurt (1985) · Bob Hoskins (1986) · Sean Connery (1987) · John Cleese (1988) · Daniel Day-Lewis (1989) · Philippe Noiret (1990) · Anthony Hopkins (1991) · Robert Downey, Jr. (1992) · Anthony Hopkins (1993) · Hugh Grant (1994) · Nigel Hawthorne (1995) · Geoffrey Rush (1996) · Robert Carlyle (1997) · Roberto Benigni (1998) · Kevin Spacey (1999)

 

 

Complete List · (1952–1959) · (1960–1979) · (1980–1999) · (2000–present)

 

[show]v · d · eBAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

 

Jamie Bell (2000) · Russell Crowe (2001) · Daniel Day-Lewis (2002) · Bill Murray (2003) · Jamie Foxx (2004) · Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) · Forest Whitaker (2006) · Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) · Mickey Rourke (2008) · Colin Firth (2009) · Colin Firth (2010)

 

 

Complete List · (1952–1959) · (1960–1979) · (1980–1999) · (2000–present)

 

[show]v · d · eGolden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama

 

Russell Crowe (2001) · Jack Nicholson (2002) · Sean Penn (2003) · Leonardo DiCaprio (2004) · Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) · Forest Whitaker (2006) · Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) · Mickey Rourke (2008) · Jeff Bridges (2009) · Colin Firth (2010)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Complete List · (1943–1960) · (1961–1980) · (1981–2000) · (2001–2020)

 

[show]v · d · eScreen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

 

Russell Crowe (2001) · Daniel Day-Lewis (2002) · Johnny Depp (2003) · Jamie Foxx (2004) · Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) · Forest Whitaker (2006) · Daniel Day-Lewis (2007) · Sean Penn (2008) · Jeff Bridges (2009) · Colin Firth (2010)

 

 

Complete list · (1994–2000) · (2001–2020)

 

 

 

Persondata

Name Day-Lewis, Daniel

Alternative names

Short description English actor

Date of birth 22 April 1957

Place of birth London, England

Date of death

Place of death

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Day-Lewis"

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About Maggie Smith

Posted by The Ricky Bear Company, Inc. on May 5, 2011 at 8:22 PM Comments comments (0)

Maggie SmithFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Maggie Smith

Smith in 2007

Born Margaret Natalie Smith

28 December 1934 (1934-12-28) (age 76)

Ilford, London, England

Other names Dame Maggie Smith

Occupation Actor

Years active 1952–present

Spouse Robert Stephens (1967–1974, divorced)

Beverley Cross (1975–1998, his death)

Children Chris Larkin, Toby Stephens

Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE (born 28 December 1934), better known as Maggie Smith, is an English film, stage, and television actress who made her stage debut in 1952 and is still performing after 59 years. She has won numerous awards for acting, both for the stage and for film, including five BAFTA Awards, two Academy Awards, two Golden Globes, two Emmy Awards, two Laurence Olivier Awards, two SAG Awards, and a Tony Award. Her critically acclaimed films include Othello (1965), The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1967), California Suite (1978), Clash of the Titans (1981), A Room with a View (1985), and Gosford Park (2001). She has also appeared in a number of widely-popular films, including Sister Act (1992) and as Professor Minerva McGonagall in the Harry Potter series.

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Career

3 Personal life

4 Filmography

4.1 Television and cinema

4.2 Theatre roles

5 Awards and nominations

6 See also

7 References

8 External links

 

[edit] Early lifeMargaret Natalie Smith was born in Ilford, then Essex, now London, the daughter of Margaret Smith (née Hutton), a Glasgow-born secretary, and Nathaniel Smith, a Newcastle upon Tyne-born public health pathologist who worked at Oxford University.[1][2][3][4][5] She has older twin brothers, Alistair and Ian.[citation needed] Smith studied at Oxford High School.[citation needed]

[edit] CareerSmith has had an extensive career both on screen and in live theatre, and is known as one of Britain's pre-eminent actresses. She began her career at the Oxford Playhouse with Frank Shelley and made her first film in 1956. She became a fixture at the Royal National Theatre in the 1960s, most notably for playing Desdemona in Othello opposite Laurence Olivier and winning her first Oscar nomination for her performance in the 1965 film version.

In 1969, she won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance as an unorthodox Scottish schoolteacher in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, a role originally created on stage by Vanessa Redgrave in 1966 in London. (Zoe Caldwell won the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play when she created the role in New York.) Smith was also awarded the 1978 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role as the brittle actress Diana Barry in California Suite, acting opposite Michael Caine. Afterwards, on hearing that Michael Palin was about to embark on a film (The Missionary) with Smith, Caine is supposed to have humorously telephoned Palin, warning him that she would steal the film.[citation needed] She also starred with Palin in the black comedy A Private Function in 1984.

Smith appeared in Sister Act in 1992 and had a major role in the 1999 film Tea With Mussolini, where she appeared as the formidable Lady Hester. Indeed, many of her more mature roles have centred on what Smith refers to as her "gallery of grotesques", playing waspish, sarcastic or plain rude characters. Recent examples of this would include the judgmental sister in Ladies in Lavender and the cantankerous snob Constance, Countess of Trentham in Gosford Park, for which she received another Oscar nomination.

Other notable roles include the querulous Charlotte Bartlett in the Merchant-Ivory production of A Room with a View, a vivid supporting turn as the aged Duchess of York in Ian McKellen's film of Richard III, and a little known but powerful performance as Lila Fisher in the 1973 film Love and Pain and the Whole Damn Thing with Timothy Bottoms. Due to the international success of the Harry Potter movies, she is now widely known for playing the role of Professor Minerva McGonagall, opposite Daniel Radcliffe, with whom she'd previously worked in the 1999 BBC television adaptation of David Copperfield, playing Betsie Trottwood. She also plays an older Wendy in the Peter Pan movie, Hook and Mrs. Medlock in The Secret Garden. In 2010 she appeared as Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham, in the British period drama Downton Abbey, and is signed to reprise her role in the second season, due to begin filming in March 2011.

She appeared in numerous productions at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Ontario, to acclaim from 1976 through to 1980. These roles included Queen Elizabeth in Richard III, Virginia Woolf in Virginia, and countless lead roles with long-time Stratford icon Brian Bedford including the Noël Coward comedy Private Lives.

On stage, her many roles have included the title character in the stage production of Alan Bennett's The Lady in the Van and starring as Amanda in a revival of Private Lives. She won a Tony Award in 1990 for Best Actress in a Play for Peter Shaffer's Lettice and Lovage, in which she starred as an eccentric tour guide in an English stately home. More recently, she appeared in Edward Albee's The Lady from Dubuque at Theatre Royal Haymarket in 2007. She was awarded Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1970, and was raised to Dame Commander (DBE) in 1990.

[edit] Personal lifeSmith has been married twice. She married Robert Stephens on 29 June 1967 at the Greenwich Register Office. The couple had two sons: actors Chris Larkin (born in 1967) and Toby Stephens (born in 1969),[4] and divorced on 6 May 1974.[4] Smith is a grandmother via both her sons.[6][7]

She married playwright Beverley Cross on 23 August 1975 at the Guildford Register Office, and the marriage ended with his death on 20 March 1998.

In 2007, the Sunday Telegraph's Mandrake diary disclosed that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. She was subsequently reported to have made a full recovery.[8]

[edit] Filmography[edit] Television and cinemaYear Title Role Notes

1958 Nowhere to Go Bridget Howard Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Newcomer

1962 Go to Blazes Chantal

1963 V.I.P.s, TheThe V.I.P.s Miss Mead Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer – Female

1964 Pumpkin Eater, TheThe Pumpkin Eater Philpot

1965 Othello Desdemona Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama

 

1965 Young Cassidy Nora Nominated – BAFTA Award

1967 Honey Pot, TheThe Honey Pot Sarah Watkins

1968 Hot Millions Patty Terwilliger Smith

1969 Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, TheThe Prime of Miss Jean Brodie Jean Brodie Academy Award for Best Actress

BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama

 

1969 Oh! What a Lovely War Music Hall Star

1972 Travels with My Aunt Aunt Augusta Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actress

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

 

1973 Love and Pain and the Whole Damn Thing Lila Fisher

1974 Carol Burnett Show, TheThe Carol Burnett Show Gwendylspire Bougraffe

1975 Carol Burnett Show, TheThe Carol Burnett Show Ms. Collins

1976 Murder by Death Dora Charleston

1978 Death on the Nile Miss Bowers Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

1978 California Suite Diana Barrie Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

 

1981 Quartet Lois Heidler Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

1981 Clash of the Titans Thetis Nominated — Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress

1982 Evil Under the Sun Daphne Castle

1982 Missionary, TheThe Missionary Lady Isabel Ames

1982 Better Late Than Never Miss Anderson

1984 Private Function, AA Private Function Joyce Chilvers BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

1984 Lily in Love Lily Wynn Nominated — British Academy Television Award for Best Actress

1985 Room with a View, AA Room with a View Charlotte Bartlett BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

 

1987 Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, TheThe Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne Judith Hearne BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

1987 Talking Heads Susan Nominated — British Academy Television Award for Best Actress

1991 Hook Wendy Darling

1992 Sister Act Reverend Mother

1992 Memento Mori Mrs. Mabel Pettigrew Nominated — British Academy Television Award for Best Actress

1993 Suddenly, Last Summer Violet Venable Nominated — Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

1993 Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit Reverend Mother

1993 Secret Garden, TheThe Secret Garden Mrs. Medlock Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

1995 Richard III Duchess of York

1996 First Wives Club, TheThe First Wives Club Gunilla Garson Goldberg National Board of Review Award for Best Cast

1997 Washington Square Aunt Lavinia Penniman Nominated — Chlotrudis Award for Best Supporting Actress

1999 Curtain Call Lily Gale

1999 Last September, TheThe Last September Lady Myra Naylor

1999 Tea With Mussolini Lady Hester Random BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

1999 All the King's Men Queen Alexandra

1999 David Copperfield Betsey Trotwood Nominated — British Academy Television Award for Best Actress

Nominated — Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

 

2001 Gosford Park Constance, Countess of Trentham Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress

Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress

Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

Satellite Award for Best Cast – Motion Picture

Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast

Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Cast

Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast

Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Nominated — Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Nominated — European Film Award for Best Actress

Nominated — Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast

 

2001 Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Minerva McGonagall Also released as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Nominated — Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress

 

2002 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Minerva McGonagall Nominated — Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast

2002 Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood Caro Eliza Bennett

2003 My House in Umbria Emily Delahunty Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

Nominated — Satellite Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

 

2004 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Minerva McGonagall

2004 Ladies in Lavender Janet Widdington Nominated—European Film Award for Best Actress

2005 Keeping Mum Grace Hawkins

2005 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Minerva McGonagall

2007 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Minerva McGonagall

2007 Becoming Jane Lady Gresham

2007 Capturing Mary Mary Gilbert Nominated — Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

2009 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Minerva McGonagall

2009 From Time to Time Linnet Oldknow

2010 Nanny McPhee and the Big Bang Mrs. Docherty

2010 Downton Abbey Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham Nominated - Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actress

Nominated - Monte Carlo Television Festival Award for Outstanding Actress

2011 Gnomeo and Juliet Lady Bluebury

2011 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II Minerva McGonagall Post-production

2011 Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, TheThe Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Post-production

2011 Quartet Jean Pre-production

2012 Hunter, TheThe Hunter In development

[edit] Theatre rolesTwelfth Night, Oxford Playhouse, 1952

He Who Gets Slapped, Clarendon Press Institute, 1952

Cinderella, Oxford Playhouse, 1952

Rookery Nook, Oxford Playhouse, 1953

The Housemaster, Oxford Playhouse, 1953

Cakes and Ale (revue), Edinburgh Festival, 1953

The Love of Four Colonels, Oxford Playhouse, 1953

The Ortolan, Maxton Hall, 1954

Don’t Listen Ladies, Oxford Playhouse, 1954

The Government Inspector, Oxford Playhouse, 1954

The Letter, Oxford Playhouse, 1954

A Man About The House, Oxford Playhouse, 1954

On the Mile (revue), Edinburgh Festival, 1954

Oxford Accents, New Watergate Theatre, London, 1954

Theatre 1900, Oxford Playhouse, 1954

Listen to the Wind, Oxford Playhouse, 1954

The Magistrate, Oxford Playhouse, 1955

The School For Scandal, Oxford Playhouse, 1955

New Faces (revue), Ethel Barrymore Theatre, New York, 1956

Share My Lettuce (revue), Lyric Hammersmith and Comedy Theatre, 1957–1958

The Stepmother, St. Martin's Theatre, 1958

The Double Dealer, Old Vic, 1959

As You Like It, Old Vic, 1959

Richard II, Old Vic, 1959

The Merry Wives of Windsor, Old Vic, 1959

What Every Woman Knows, Old Vic, 1960

Rhinoceros, Strand Theatre, 1960

Strip the Willow, UK Tour, 1960

The Rehearsal, Bristol Old Vic/ London, 1961

The Private Ear and The Public Eye, Globe Theatre, 1962

Mary, Mary, Queen's Theatre, 1963

The Recruiting Officer, National Theatre - Old Vic, 1963

Othello, National Theatre - Old Vic, 1964

The Master Builder, National Theatre - Old Vic, 1964

Hay Fever, National Theatre - Old Vic, 1964

Much Ado About Nothing, National Theatre - Old Vic, 1965

Black Comedy, National Theatre - Chichester and Old Vic, 1965

Miss Julie, National Theatre - Chichester and Old Vic, 1965–1966

Trelawney of the Wells, National Theatre - Old Vic, 1966

A Bond Honoured, National Theatre - Old Vic, 1966

The Country Wife, National Theatre - Chichester and Old Vic, 1969

The Beaux Stratagem, National Theatre - Old Vic/ Ahmanson Theatre, Los Angeles, 1970

Hedda Gabler, National Theatre - Cambridge Theatre, 1970

Design For Living, Ahmanson Theatre, Los Angeles, 1971

Private Lives, Queens Theatre, 1972–1973

Peter Pan, London Coliseum, 1973

Snap[disambiguation needed], Vaudeville Theatre, 1974

Private Lives, Los Angeles, 1974/ 46th Street Theatre, New York, 1975

The Way of the World, Stratford, Canada, 1976

Antony and Cleopatra, Stratford, Canada, 1976

Three Sisters, Stratford, Canada, 1976

The Guardsman, Stratford, Canada/ Ahmanson Theatre, Los Angeles, 1976

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Stratford, Canada/ Ahmanson Theatre, Los Angeles, 1977

Richard III[disambiguation needed], Stratford, Canada, 1977

As You Like It, Stratford, Canada, 1977

Hay Fever, Stratford, Canada, 1977

Macbeth, Stratford, Canada, 1978

Private Lives, Stratford, Canada, 1978

Night and Day, Phoenix Theatre/ Washington D.C./ ANTA Playhouse, New York, 1979–1980

Much Ado About Nothing, Stratford, Canada, 1980

The Seagull, Stratford, Canada, 1980

Virginia, Theatre Royal, Haymarket, 1981

The Way of the World, Theatre Royal, Haymarket, 1984

The Interpreters, Queens Theatre, 1985

The Infernal Machine, Lyric Hammersmith Theatre, 1986

Coming Into Land, National Theatre/ Lyttelton, 1987

Lettice and Lovage, Globe Theatre, 1987–1988

Lettice and Lovage, Ethel Barrymore Theatre, New York, 1990

The Importance of Being Earnest, Aldwych Theatre, 1993

Three Tall Women, Wyndham's Theatre, 1994–1995

Talking Heads, Chichester and Comedy Theatre, 1996

A Delicate Balance, Theatre Royal, Haymarket, 1997–1998

The Lady in the Van, Queens Theatre, 1999–2000

The Breath of Life, Theatre Royal, Haymarket, 2002–2003

Talking Heads, Tour of Australia, 2004

The Lady From Dubuque, Theatre Royal, Haymarket, 2007

[edit] Awards and nominationsMain article: List of Maggie Smith awards and nominations

[edit] See alsoTale Spinners For Children

University College Players

[edit] References1.^ Mackenzie, Suzie (2004-11-20). "You have to laugh". Guardian Unlimited. http://www.guardian.co.uk/weekend/story/0,3605,1354891,00.html?gusrc=rss. Retrieved 2007-12-10.

2.^ Maggie Smith Biography (1934-)

3.^ Maggies Smith at Yahoo Movies.

4.^ a b c Maggie Smith biography. Tiscali.film & TV.

5.^ Maggie Smith. Film Reference.com.

6.^ Michael Coveney, "I'm Very Scared of Being Back on Stage", thisislondon.co.uk, 3 February 2007 [1]

7.^ Mark Lawson, "Prodigal Son", The Guardian, 31 May 2007

8.^ Actress Maggie Smith recounts cancer battle

[edit] External linksMaggie Smith at the Internet Movie Database

Maggie Smith at the Internet Broadway Database

You have to laugh - The Guardian, 20 November 2004, in-depth interview and profile.

Maggie Smith at the British Film Institute's Screenonline

[show] Awards for Maggie Smith

 

[show]v · d · eAcademy Award for Best Actress

 

Sophia Loren (1961) · Anne Bancroft (1962) · Patricia Neal (1963) · Julie Andrews (1964) · Julie Christie (1965) · Elizabeth Taylor (1966) · Katharine Hepburn (1967) · Katharine Hepburn / Barbra Streisand (1968) · Maggie Smith (1969) · Glenda Jackson (1970) · Jane Fonda (1971) · Liza Minnelli (1972) · Glenda Jackson (1973) · Ellen Burstyn (1974) · Louise Fletcher (1975) · Faye Dunaway (1976) · Diane Keaton (1977) · Jane Fonda (1978) · Sally Field (1979) · Sissy Spacek (1980)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Complete list · (1928–1940) · (1941–1960) · (1961–1980) · (1981–2000) · (2001-present)

 

 

[show]v · d · eAcademy Award for Best Supporting Actress

 

Rita Moreno (1961) · Patty Duke (1962) · Margaret Rutherford (1963) · Lila Kedrova (1964) · Shelley Winters (1965) · Sandy Dennis (1966) · Estelle Parsons (1967) · Ruth Gordon (1968) · Goldie Hawn (1969) · Helen Hayes (1970) · Cloris Leachman (1971) · Eileen Heckart (1972) · Tatum O'Neal (1973) · Ingrid Bergman (1974) · Lee Grant (1975) · Beatrice Straight (1976) · Vanessa Redgrave (1977) · Maggie Smith (1978) · Meryl Streep (1979) · Mary Steenburgen (1980)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Complete list · (1928–1940) · (1941–1960) · (1961–1980) · (1981–2000) · (2001-present)

 

 

[show]v · d · eBAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

 

Rachel Roberts British & Shirley MacLaine Foreign (1960) · Dora Bryan British & Sophia Loren Foreign (1961) · Leslie Caron British & Anne Bancroft Foreign (1962) · Rachel Roberts British & Patricia Neal Foreign (1963) · Audrey Hepburn British & Anne Bancroft Foreign (1964) · Julie Christie British & Patricia Neal Foreign (1965) · Elizabeth Taylor British & Jeanne Moreau Foreign (1966) · Edith Evans British & Anouk Aimée Foreign (1967) · Katharine Hepburn (1968) · Maggie Smith (1969) · Katharine Ross (1970) · Glenda Jackson (1971) · Liza Minnelli (1972) · Stéphane Audran (1973) · Joanne Woodward (1974) · Ellen Burstyn (1975) · Louise Fletcher (1976) · Diane Keaton (1977) · Jane Fonda (1978) · Jane Fonda (1979)

 

 

Complete List · (1952–1959) · (1960–1979) · (1980–1999) · (2000–present)

 

[show]v · d · eBAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

 

Judy Davis (1980) · Meryl Streep (1981) · Katharine Hepburn (1982) · Julie Walters (1983) · Maggie Smith (1984) · Peggy Ashcroft (1985) · Maggie Smith (1986) · Anne Bancroft (1987) · Maggie Smith (1988) · Pauline Collins (1989) · Jessica Tandy (1990) · Jodie Foster (1991) · Emma Thompson (1992) · Holly Hunter (1993) · Susan Sarandon (1994) · Emma Thompson (1995) · Brenda Blethyn (1996) · Judi Dench (1997) · Cate Blanchett (1998) · Annette Bening (1999)

 

 

Complete List · (1952–1959) · (1960–1979) · (1980–1999) · (2000–present)

 

[show]v · d · eBAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

 

Rosanna Arquette (1985) · Judi Dench (1986) · Susan Wooldridge (1987) · Olympia Dukakis (1988) · Michelle Pfeiffer (1989) · Whoopi Goldberg (1990) · Kate Nelligan (1991) · Miranda Richardson (1992) · Miriam Margolyes (1993) · Kristin Scott Thomas (1994) · Kate Winslet (1995) · Juliette Binoche (1996) · Sigourney Weaver (1997) · Judi Dench (1998) · Maggie Smith (1999) · Julie Walters (2000) · Jennifer Connelly (2001) · Catherine Zeta-Jones (2002) · Renée Zellweger (2003) · Cate Blanchett (2004) · Thandie Newton (2005) · Jennifer Hudson (2006) · Tilda Swinton (2007) · Penélope Cruz (2008) · Mo'Nique (2009)

 

 

Complete List · (1968-1984) · (1985-2009) · (2010-2034)

 

[show]v · d · ePrimetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

 

Judy Davis (2001) · Laura Linney (2002) · Maggie Smith (2003) · Meryl Streep (2004) · S. Epatha Merkerson (2005) · Helen Mirren (2006) · Helen Mirren (2007) · Laura Linney (2008) · Jessica Lange (2009) · Claire Danes (2010)

 

 

Complete List · (1952–1975) · (1976–2000) · (2001–2025)

 

[show]v · d · eGolden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

 

Rosalind Russell (1961) · Rosalind Russell (1962) · Shirley MacLaine (1963) · Julie Andrews (1964) · Julie Andrews (1965) · Lynn Redgrave (1966) · Anne Bancroft (1967) · Barbra Streisand (1968) · Patty Duke (1969) · Carrie Snodgress (1970) · Twiggy (1971) · Liza Minnelli (1972) · Glenda Jackson (1973) · Raquel Welch (1974) · Ann-Margret (1975) · Barbra Streisand (1976) · Diane Keaton/Marsha Mason (1977) · Ellen Burstyn/Maggie Smith (1978) · Bette Midler (1979) · Sissy Spacek (1980)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Complete List · (1950–1960) · (1961–1980) · (1981–2000) · (2001–2020)

 

[show]v · d · eGolden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

 

Joan Hackett (1981) · Jessica Lange (1982) · Cher (1983) · Peggy Ashcroft (1984) · Meg Tilly (1985) · Maggie Smith (1986) · Olympia Dukakis (1987) · Sigourney Weaver (1988) · Julia Roberts (1989) · Whoopi Goldberg (1990) · Mercedes Ruehl (1991) · Joan Plowright (1992) · Winona Ryder (1993) · Dianne Wiest (1994) · Mira Sorvino (1995) · Lauren Bacall (1996) · Kim Basinger (1997) · Lynn Redgrave (1998) · Angelina Jolie (1999) · Kate Hudson (2000)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Complete List · (1943–1960) · (1961–1980) · (1981–2000) · (2001–present)

 

[show]v · d · eSociety of London Theatre Special Award

 

Laurence Olivier (1979) · Ralph Richardson (1980) · Charles Wintour (1982) · Joan Littlewood (1983) · John Gielgud (1985) · Alec Guinness (1988) · Peggy Ashcroft (1991) · Ninette de Valois (1992) · Kenneth MacMillan (1993) · Sam Wanamaker (1994) · Harold Pinter (1996) · Margaret Harris (1997) · Ed Mirvish / David Mirvish (1998) · Peter Hall (1999) · Rupert Rhymes (2002) · Sam Mendes (2003) · Judi Dench (2004) · Alan Bennett (2005) · Ian McKellen (2006) · John Tomlinson (2007) · Andrew Lloyd Webber (2008) · Alan Ayckbourn (2009) · Maggie Smith (2010) · Stephen Sondheim (2011)

 

 

[show]v · d · eTony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play

 

Irene Worth (1976) · Julie Harris (1977) · Jessica Tandy (1978) · Constance Cummings / Carole Shelley (1979) · Phyllis Frelich (1980) · Jane Lapotaire (1981) · Zoe Caldwell (1982) · Jessica Tandy (1983) · Glenn Close (1984) · Stockard Channing (1985) · Lily Tomlin (1986) · Linda Lavin (1987) · Joan Allen (1988) · Pauline Collins (1989) · Maggie Smith (1990) · Mercedes Ruehl (1991) · Glenn Close (1992) · Madeline Kahn (1993) · Diana Rigg (1994) · Cherry Jones (1995) · Zoe Caldwell (1996) · Janet McTeer (1997) · Marie Mullen (1998) · Judi Dench (1999) · Jennifer Ehle (2000)

 

 

Complete list: (1947–1975) · (1976–2000) · (2001–present)

 

 

 

 

Persondata

Name Smith, Margaret Natalie

Alternative names

Short description English actress

Date of birth 28 December 1934

Place of birth Ilford, Essex, England

Date of death

Place of death

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggie_Smith"

Categories: 1934 births | Anglo-Scots | BAFTA winners (people) | Best Actress Academy Award winners | Best Musical or Comedy Actress Golden Globe (film) winners | Best Supporting Actress Academy Award winners | Best Supporting Actress Golden Globe (film) winners | Dames Commander of the Order of the British Empire | Actresses awarded British damehoods | Emmy Award winners | English film actors | English stage actors | English television actors | English people of Scottish descent | Evening Standard Award for Best Actress | Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture Screen Actors Guild Award winners | Living people | People from Ilford | Royal National Theatre Company members | Tony Award winners | Former pupils of Oxford High School (Oxford) | BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actress

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About Rupert Grint

Posted by The Ricky Bear Company, Inc. on May 5, 2011 at 8:19 PM Comments comments (0)

Rupert GrintFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rupert Grint

Grint at the film premiere of Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows in New York City, November 2010

Born Rupert Alexander Lloyd Grint

24 August 1988 (1988-08-24) (age 22)

Harlow, Essex, England, United Kingdom

Occupation Actor

Years active 2001–present

Rupert Alexander Lloyd Grint[1] (born 24 August 1988) is an English actor, best known for portraying Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter film series. He has also starred in other films such as Driving Lessons, Cherrybomb, and Wild Target.

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Career

3 Personal life

4 Filmography

5 Awards

6 References

7 External links

 

Early lifeGrint was born in Harlow, Essex and grew up in Hertfordshire. His mother, Joanna Grint (née Parsons), is a housewife, and his father, Nigel Grint, is a memorabilia dealer.[2] He has one brother, James (born in 1990), and three sisters: Georgina (born in 1993), Samantha (born in 1995) and Charlotte (born in 1998). Before being cast in the Harry Potter franchise, he had only appeared in school plays and at his local theatre group, Top Hat Stage School, which is still running now in Hertford run by Warren Bacci. He received special mention in a local newspaper after playing a princess's lady-in-waiting in "The Radgold Games" at Richard Hale School. As an all-boys school, female roles are played by boys. As a young child, he was once cast as a fish in a play based on the story of Noah's Ark. He also played Rumpelstiltskin in another school play. As a child, he also used to voluntarily help out in his local church as a bellringer.[3]

He attended St Josephs Primary School in Hertford, a Roman Catholic primary school.[4]

CareerA fan of the Harry Potter book series, young Grint was interested in getting a role in the film. For his audition, he sent a video he made of himself, in which he dressed as his drama teacher while rapping about how much he wanted the part; Grint won the casting selection with the video. After completing the first Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, he appeared as science-whiz Alan A. Allen in the British film Thunderpants (2002). In 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010, and 2011, he again starred as Ron Weasley in the Potter sequels Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 and Part 2.

Grint also starred in the comedy drama Driving Lessons, which was released in 2006. Grint received excellent reviews for his first leading role: critics praised the realism he brought into the role of shy teenager Ben Marshall, as well as his "riotous comedic timing" and "fantastic screen chemistry" with Walters.

Also known for his radio and television voice-over work, he appeared as Nigel Molesworth in the Baggy Trousers series for BBC Radio 4[5] and voiced Peter Pan in a BBC documentary.

On 9 July 2007, Grint and fellow cast-mates Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson left imprints of their hands, feet and wands in front of Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood.[6]

On 2 July 2008, it was announced that Grint would star in gritty thriller Cherrybomb alongside Robert Sheehan and Kimberley Nixon.[7] Filming was wrapped up in late August 2008 and the film opened in the UK on 23 April 2010.[8]

While directing Prisoner of Azkaban, director Alfonso Cuarón said Grint is "the likely future star out of the Hogwarts trio".[9]

He voiced Ron Weasley in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, and the Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince video games.

Michael McGuire, a writer for the Examiner, had this to say about Grint's performance in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince:

"I appreciated Rupert Grint for the first time. To me, he's always been "that other guy" in the Potter movies, but he truly steps forward in this edition and, if he keeps it up, he could be the one of the three getting the best parts a decade from now."

Rupert Grint appeared as the Star in a Reasonably Priced Car in Episode Three of Series Fifteen of Top Gear,[10] setting a lap new record[11] in the Kia Cee'd, although the record was broken two weeks later by both Cameron Diaz and Tom Cruise.

Grint starred alongside Bill Nighy and Emily Blunt in Wild Target, a comedy remake of 1993 French film Cible Emouvante.[12] The film opened in the UK on 18 June 2010.[13]

On 6 January 2011, Grint made a guest appearance in Come Fly with Me.

On 11 March 2011, it was rumoured that Grint is currently in talks to star in the film Comrade, which will be directed by Petter Næss.[14] It was confirmed on 22 March that Grint will star in the film.[15]

On 18 March 2011, Grint appeared in a comedy sketch on Red Nose Day 2011 alongside Tom Felton, George Michael, Justin Bieber, Keira Knightley and former Prime Minister Gordon Brown.[16]

Personal lifeIn July 2004, Grint finished Richard Hale School, taking his GCSE examinations. When not working, he enjoys learning to ride the unicycle, drawing/sketching, watching Tottenham Hotspur and playing golf. He has stated that, like the character he portrays, Ron Weasley, he has arachnophobia.[17]

Grint purchased an ice-cream van and then stated jokingly that if his career falls out after the end of the eight part series, then he'll still have the van. According to his co-star Emma Watson from her interview with Conan O'Brien, the van has all the toppings and such in it. He also brought it to the last day of filming Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and served ice-cream on set.[18][19]

In September 2007, Grint and his co-stars, along with David Heyman and David Yates, attended the National Movie Awards. He lost to his co-star Daniel Radcliffe for Best Actor.

Hair care company Brylcreem released a list of the best and worst male hairstyles of the celebrity world in 2007 putting Rupert Grint's haircut with the Top 5 Best Male Film Star haircuts and his co-star, Daniel Radcliffe, in the Top 5 Worst Male Film Star haircuts.[20]

Daniel Radcliffe stated in Empire magazine (August 2008) that although he and Emma Watson have had disagreements, it was impossible to fall out with Grint as he is "the most laid back guy in the world."

Grint stated that he considers himself and castmates Emma Watson and Daniel Radcliffe 'lucky' to have escaped the more serious problems that often plague child stars. All three have often said of their friendship as "more like siblings", having known each other from an early age.

When asked whether he would keep a memento from the Harry Potter series, Grint admitted that following the conclusion of filming the Goblet of Fire in 2005, he secretly stole the 'Golden Egg' prop used in the film, which apparently caused "a bit of a fracas" with the props department.[21]

Grint is involved with charity, having donated clothes[22] and artwork[23] to charity auctions, as well as participating in the Wacky Rally in 2010 with James and Oliver Phelps, which raised money for England’s Royal National Lifeboat Institution.[24]

FilmographyList of film performances Year Title Role Notes

2001 Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Ron Weasley Also released as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

2002 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Ron Weasley

2002 Thunderpants Alan A. Allen

2004 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Ron Weasley

2005 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Ron Weasley

2006 Driving Lessons Ben Marshall Leading role

2007 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Ron Weasley

2009 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Ron Weasley

2009 Cherrybomb Malachy McKinney Leading role

2010 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Ron Weasley

2010 Wild Target Tony

2010 Come Fly with Me Himself

2011 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Ron Weasley

2011 Eddie the Eagle Eddie "The Eagle" Edwards Pre-production[25]

2012 Comrade Private Robin “Smithy” Southey Smith Filming

AwardsAwards

Year Award Category Work Outcome

2002 Empire Award Best Debut Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Nominated

Satellite Award Outstanding New Talent Won

Young Artist Award Most Promising Young Newcomer Won

Best Ensemble in a Feature Film Nominated

2003 PFCS Award Best Acting Ensemble Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Nominated

2006 MTV Movie Award Best On-Screen Team Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Nominated

2007 National Movie Award Best Performance by a Male Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Nominated

2009 Scream Award Best Supporting Actor Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Nominated

Portrait Choice Award Best Male Movie Performance Nominated

2010 People's Choice Award Favorite On-Screen Team Nominated

2010 Bravo Otto Movie Star Won

2011 National Movie Awards Performance of the Year Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Nominated[26]

References1.^ "harrypotter.warnerbros.co.uk". Warner Bros. (Flash: click appropriate actor's image, click "Actor Bio") (Official site). http://harrypotter.warnerbros.co.uk/gobletoffire/master/index.html. Retrieved 28 March 2006.

2.^ "Rupert Grint Biography (1988-)". http://www.filmreference.com/film/26/Rupert-Grint.html. Retrieved 2011-01-19.

3.^ "The Press Archives @ RupertGrint.Net". http://www.rupertgrint.net/old%20RG.net/press/Interviews/2001cnn.php. Retrieved 2011-01-19.

4.^ "Rupert Grint Yahoo! Movies". http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/contributor/1802866082/bio. Retrieved 2011-01-19.

5.^ "radiolistings.co.uk". Radiolistings: Baggy Trousers episode guide. http://www.radiolistings.co.uk/programmes/baggy_trousers.html. Retrieved 28 February 2006.

6.^ "Hollywood Blvd Celebrates Potter's 'Wands Of Fame'". CBS2.com. 9 Jul. 2007. http://cbs2.com/topstories/local_story_190124828.html. Retrieved 10 Jul. 2007. [dead link]

7.^ "Rupert's New Film "Cherrybomb"". RupertGrint.Net. 9 Jul. 2007. http://www.rupertgrint.net/ruperts-new-film-cherrybomb/. Retrieved 2 Jul. 2008.

8.^ "'Cherrybomb releases Today in the UK". RupertGrint.net. 23 Apr 2010. http://www.rupertgrint.net/rupert-grints-cherrybomb-releases-today-uk/. Retrieved 12 Jul 2010.

9.^ Lamble, David (28 December 2006). "The Dystopian Future Awaits". Bay Area Reporter Online. http://www.ebar.com/arts/art_article.php?sec=film&article=285. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

10.^ [http://www.rupertgrint.net/rupert-grint-reasonably-priced-car / "Rupert Grint in a Reasonably Priced Car"]. RupertGrint.Net. http://www.rupertgrint.net/rupert-grint-reasonably-priced-car /. Retrieved 29 Jun. 2010.

11.^ [http://www.rupertgrint.net/rupert-grint-top-gear / "Rupert Grint on Top Gear"]. RupertGrint.Net. http://www.rupertgrint.net/rupert-grint-top-gear /. Retrieved 12 Jul. 2010.

12.^ "Rupert Cast in New Film". RupertGrint.Net. 2008. http://www.rupertgrint.net/rupert-cast-new-film-wild-target/. Retrieved 12 July 2010.

13.^ "Wild Target Opens Today". RupertGrint.Net. 18 Jun 2010. http://www.rupertgrint.net/rupert-grints-wild-target-opens-today-exclusive-review/. Retrieved 12 July 2010.

14.^ "Grint to star in Comrade?". Rupert-grint.us. 2011-03-10. http://www.rupert-grint.us/wordpress/2011/03/10/rupert-grint-to-star-in-norwegian-film-comrade/. Retrieved 2011-03-19.

15.^ http://www.snitchseeker.com/harry-potter-news/rupert-grint-confirmed-to-star-in-6-week-production-of-anti-war-drama-comrade-80357/

16.^ Jody Thompson. "Comic Relief 2011: James Corden and George Michael's Red Nose Day 'Smithy' sketch | Mail Online". Dailymail.co.uk. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1367832/Comic-Relief-2011-James-Corden-sketch-George-Michael-Justin-Bieber-Gordon-Brown-JLS-duet-Red-Nose-Day-highlight.html. Retrieved 2011-03-19.

17.^ "Harry Potter: Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint Celebrity Interview Unscripted - Moviefone". http://movies.aol.com/unscripted/daniel-radcliffe-emma-watson-rupert/harry-potter-and-the-order-of-the/1938773. Retrieved 2011-01-19. [dead link]

18.^ "theage.com.au". The Age article (Melbourne). 24 June 2007. http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/06/23/1182019425502.html.

19.^ "Emma Watson, Patton Oswalt, Mark Ronson". Late Night with Conan O'Brien. NBC. 12 Jul. 2007.

20.^ "Best Music hair" from The Daily Telegraph

21.^ "Access Hollywood On Set Interview with Rupert Grint". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeMOb7lqxR8. Retrieved 2011-01-19.

22.^ http://www.ok.co.uk/posts/view/20032/Stars-donate-clothes-to-cancer-charity-auction

23.^ http://london.jollypeople.com/rupert-grint-charity/

24.^ http://rnli.org.uk/who_we_are/rnli_people/celebrity-supporters/oliver-and-james-phelps

25.^ Sweeney, Ken (22 November 2009). "The Diary: Irish director makes leap of faith in casting for "Eagle" biopic". Sunday Tribune (Tribune Newspapers). http://www.tribune.ie/article/2009/nov/22/the-diary-ken-sweeney/.

26.^ http://www.nationalmovieawards.com/home

External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Rupert Grint

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Rupert Grint: Photos, Bio, and News entry at TV Guide web site

Rupert Grint at TV.com web site

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Name Grint, Rupert

Alternative names Grint, Rupert Alexander

Short description English actor

Date of birth 24 August 1988

Place of birth Harlow, Essex, England, U.K.

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Categories: 1988 births | Living people | English child actors | English film actors | English radio actors | English television actors | English voice actors | People from Essex | People from Harlow

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About Emma Watson

Posted by The Ricky Bear Company, Inc. on May 5, 2011 at 8:17 PM Comments comments (0)

Emma WatsonFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article is about the actress. For other people named Emma Watson, see Emma Watson (disambiguation).

Emma Watson

Watson in November 2010

Born Emma Charlotte Duerre Watson[1]

15 April 1990 (1990-04-15) (age 21)

Paris, France

Occupation Actress, model

Years active 2001 – present

Website

emmawatson.com

Emma Charlotte Duerre Watson (born 15 April 1990) is an English actress and model who rose to prominence playing Hermione Granger, one of three starring roles in the Harry Potter film series. Watson was cast as Hermione at the age of nine, having previously acted only in school plays.[2] From 2001 to 2010, she starred in seven Harry Potter films alongside Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint; she will return for the final installment: the second part of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.[3] Watson's work on the Harry Potter series has earned her several awards and more than £10 million.[4] She made her modelling debut for Burberry's Autumn/Winter campaign in 2009.

In 2007, Watson announced her involvement in two non-Harry Potter productions: the television adaptation of the novel Ballet Shoes and an animated film, The Tale of Despereaux. Ballet Shoes was broadcast on 26 December 2007 to an audience of 5.2 million, and The Tale of Despereaux, based on the novel by Kate DiCamillo, was released in 2008 and grossed over US $70 million in worldwide sales.[5][6]

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Career

2.1 Harry Potter

2.2 Other acting work

3 Personal life

4 Filmography

5 Awards

6 References

7 External links

 

Early lifeEmma Watson was born in Paris to Jacqueline Luesby and Chris Watson, both British lawyers.[7][8] Watson has one French grandmother,[9] and lived in Paris until the age of five. Following her parents' divorce, she moved with her mother and younger brother to Oxfordshire.[7] From the age of six, Watson wanted to become an actress,[10] and for a number of years she trained at the Oxford branch of Stagecoach Theatre Arts, a part-time theatre school where she studied singing, dancing and acting.[11] By the age of ten, she had performed in various Stagecoach productions and school plays, including Arthur: The Young Years and The Happy Prince,[12] but she had never acted professionally before the Harry Potter series. "I had no idea of the scale of the film series," she stated in a 2007 interview with Parade; "If I had I would have been completely overwhelmed."[13]

CareerHarry PotterIn 1999, casting began for Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (released as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in the United States), the film adaptation of British author J. K. Rowling's bestselling novel. Casting agents found Watson through her Oxford theatre teacher,[10] and producers were impressed by her confidence. After eight auditions,[14] producer David Heyman told Watson and fellow applicants Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint that they had been cast for the roles of the schoolfriends Hermione Granger, Harry Potter and Ron Weasley respectively. Rowling supported Watson from her first screen test.[10]

The release of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone in 2001 was Watson's debut screen performance. The film broke records for opening-day sales and opening-weekend takings and was the highest-grossing film of 2001.[15][16] Critics praised the performances of the three leads, often singling out Watson for particular acclaim; The Daily Telegraph called her performance "admirable",[17] and IGN said she "stole the show".[18] Watson was nominated for five awards for her performance in Philosopher's Stone, winning the Young Artist Award for Leading Young Actress.[19]

A year later, Watson again starred as Hermione in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, the second installment of the series. Although the film received mixed reviews, reviewers were positive about the lead actors' performances. The Los Angeles Times said Watson and her peers had matured between films,[20] while The Times criticised director Chris Columbus for "under-employing" Watson's hugely popular character.[21] Watson received an Otto Award from the German magazine Bravo for her performance.[22]

In 2004, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was released. Watson was appreciative of the more assertive role Hermione played, calling her character "charismatic" and "a fantastic role to play".[23] Although critics panned Radcliffe's performance, labelling him "wooden", they praised Watson; The New York Times lauded her performance, saying "Luckily Mr. Radcliffe's blandness is offset by Ms. Watson's spiky impatience. Harry may show off his expanding wizardly skills ... but Hermione ... earns the loudest applause with a decidedly unmagical punch to Draco Malfoy's deserving nose."[24] Although Prisoner of Azkaban remains the lowest-grossing Harry Potter film as of April 2009, Watson's personal performance won her two Otto Awards and the Child Performance of the Year award from Total Film.[25][26][27]

 

Watson at premiere of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in 2005With Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005), both Watson and the Harry Potter film series reached new milestones. The film set records for a Harry Potter opening weekend, a non-May opening weekend in the US, and an opening weekend in the UK. Critics praised the increasing maturity of Watson and her teenage co-stars; the New York Times called her performance "touchingly earnest".[28] For Watson, much of the humour of the film sprang from the tension among the three lead characters as they matured. She said, "I loved all the arguing. ... I think it's much more realistic that they would argue and that there would be problems."[29] Nominated for three awards for Goblet of Fire, Watson won a bronze Otto Award.[30][31][32] Later that year, Watson became the youngest person to appear on the cover of Teen Vogue,[33] an appearance she reprised in August 2009.[34] In 2006, Watson played Hermione in The Queen's Handbag, a special mini-episode of Harry Potter in celebration of Queen Elizabeth II's 80th birthday.[35]

 

Watson signing autographs for fans outside Grauman's Chinese Theatre, 2007The fifth film in the Harry Potter franchise, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, was released in 2007. A huge financial success, the film set a record worldwide opening-weekend gross of $332.7 million.[36] Watson won the inaugural National Movie Award for Best Female Performance.[37] As the fame of the actress and the series continued, Watson and fellow Harry Potter co-stars Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint left imprints of their hands, feet and wands in front of Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood on 9 July 2007.[38]

 

Handprints, footprints and wand prints of (from left to right) Emma Watson, Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint.Despite the success of Order of the Phoenix, the future of the Harry Potter franchise became surrounded in doubt, as all three lead actors were hesitant to sign on to continue their roles for the final two episodes.[39] Radcliffe eventually signed for the final films on 2 March 2007,[39] but Watson was considerably more hesitant.[40] She explained that the decision was significant, as the films represented a further four-year commitment to the role, but eventually conceded that she "could never let [the role of] Hermione go",[41] signing for the role on 23 March 2007.[42] In return for committing to the final films, Watson's pay was doubled to £2 million per film;[43] she concluded that "in the end, the pluses outweighed the minuses".[13] Principal photography for the sixth film began in late 2007, with Watson's part being filmed from 18 December to 17 May 2008.[44][45]

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince premiered on 15 July 2009,[46] having been controversially delayed from November 2008.[47] With the lead actors now in their late teens, critics were increasingly willing to review them on the same level as the rest of the film's all-star cast, which the Los Angeles Times described as "a comprehensive guide to contemporary UK acting".[48] The Washington Post felt Watson to have given "[her] most charming performance to date",[49] while The Daily Telegraph described the lead actors as "newly-liberated and energized, eager to give all they have to what's left of the series".[50]

Watson's filming for the final installment of the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, began on 18 February 2009[51] and ended on 12 June 2010.[52] For financial and scripting reasons, the original book has been divided into two films which were shot back to back.[53][54] Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part 1 was released in November 2010, and the second film is scheduled for release in July 2011.[55]

Other acting workWatson's first non-Potter role was the 2007 BBC film Ballet Shoes, an adaptation of the novel of the same title by Noel Streatfeild.[56][57] The film's director Sandra Goldbacher commented that Watson was "perfect" for the starring role of aspiring actress Pauline Fossil: "She has a piercing, delicate aura that makes you want to gaze and gaze at her."[58] Ballet Shoes was broadcast in the UK on Boxing Day 2007 to an audience of 5.7 million viewers, despite generally poor reviews.[59][60][61][62][63]

Watson also lent her voice to the role of Princess Pea in the animated film The Tale of Despereaux, a children's comedy starring Matthew Broderick.[64] The Tale of Despereaux was released in December 2008 and grossed $87 million worldwide.[5]

In December 2008, Watson stated she wanted to go to university after she completed the Potter series.[65]

In May 2010, Watson was reported to be in talks to star in a film adaptation of The Perks of Being a Wallflower.[66] She confirmed she will star in the adaptation and that filming would begin in summer 2011.[67] Also that month, she announced that she would appear in a music video for One Night Only after meeting lead singer George Craig at the 2010 Winter/Summer Burberry advertising campaign. Watson also expressed an interest to be in a musical film after being involved in the Harry Potter films.[68] The video, "Say You Don't Want It", was screened on Channel 4 on 26 June 2010 and released on 16 August.[69]

In her first post-Harry Potter film, Watson has been cast in the upcoming My Week with Marilyn as Lucy, a wardrobe assistant who has a few dates with the main character, Colin Clark.[70][71]

As she has grown older, Watson has become something of a fashion devotee, saying that she sees fashion as very similar to art, which she studied in school. In September 2008, she told a blogger, "I've been focusing on art a lot, and fashion's a great extension of that."[72]

In 2008, the British press reported that Watson was to replace Keira Knightley as the face of the fashion house Chanel, but this was flatly denied by both parties.[73][74] In June 2009, following several months of rumours, Watson confirmed that she would be partnering Burberry as the face of their new campaign; she received an estimated six-figure fee for modelling Burberry's Autumn/Winter 2009 collection.[75][76][77] She later appeared in Burberry's 2010 Spring/Summer campaign alongside her brother Alex, musicians George Craig and Matt Gilmour, and Max Hurd.[78][79] Watson continued her involvement in fashion advertising when she modelled for Lancôme in March of 2011.[80]

In September 2009, Watson announced her involvement with People Tree, a Fair Trade fashion brand.[81] Watson worked as a 'creative advisor' for People Tree to create a spring line of clothing, which was released in February 2010;[81][82] the range featured styles inspired by southern France and the City of London.[82][83] The collection, described by The Times as "very clever" despite their "quiet hope that [she] would become tangled at the first hemp-woven hurdle",[84] was widely publicised in tabloids such as You magazine, Heat Magazine, Teen Vogue,[85] Cosmopolitan, and People. Watson, who was not paid for the collaboration,[86] admitted that competition for the range was minimal,[84] but argued that "Fashion is a great way to empower people and give them skills; rather than give cash to charity you can help people by buying the clothes they make and supporting things they take pride in";[87] adding, "I think young people like me are becoming increasingly aware of the humanitarian issues surrounding fast fashion and want to make good choices but there aren't many options out there."[84] Watson continued her involvement with People Tree, resulting in a release of a 2010 Autumn/Winter collection.[88]

Personal life

Watson at premiere of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince in July 2009Watson's extended family has grown, as her divorced parents each have new partners. Her father has a son, and identical twin girls.[89] Her mother's partner has two sons who "regularly stay with her".[90] Watson's full brother, Alexander, has appeared as an extra in two Harry Potter films,[79] and her half-sisters were cast as the young Pauline Fossil in the BBC's Ballet Shoes adaptation.[89]

After moving to Oxford with her mother and brother, Watson attended The Dragon School, an independent preparatory school, until June 2003 and then moved to Headington School, an independent school for girls, also in Oxford.[7] While on film sets, Watson and her peers were tutored for up to five hours a day;[91] despite the focus on filming she maintained high academic standards. In June 2006, Watson took GCSE examinations in 10 subjects, achieving eight A* and two A grades;[7][92] she was a target of friendly ribbing on the Harry Potter set because of her straight-A exam results.[33] She received A grades in her 2008 A level examinations in English Literature, Geography and Art,[93] and in her 2007 AS (advanced subsidiary) level in History of Art.[7]

After leaving school, Watson took a gap year[93] to film Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows beginning in February 2009,[54] but said she "definitely want[ed] to go to university".[65] Despite numerous contradictory news stories, some from highly reputable sources, claiming that she would "definitely" attend Trinity College, Cambridge;[94] Columbia University;[95][96] Brown University or Yale University,[97] Watson was reluctant to commit publicly to any one institution, saying that she would announce her decision first on her official website.[98] In interviews with Jonathan Ross and David Letterman in July 2009, she confirmed that she was planning to study liberal arts in the United States,[1] saying that – having missed so much school as a child for filming – the "broad curriculum" of American higher education appealed to her more than British universities, "where you have to just choose one thing to study for three years".[14] In July 2009, after a second storm of rumour,[99] The Providence Journal reported that Watson had "grudgingly admitted" that she had chosen Brown University, located in Providence, Rhode Island.[100][101] Watson defended her attempts to avoid announcing her choice of university – accidentally slipped by Daniel Radcliffe and producer David Heyman,[102][103] during interviews publicising the release of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and finally confirmed in September 2009 after the university's academic year had started[104] – saying that she "want[ed] to be normal. ... I want to do it properly, like everyone else. As long as I don't walk in and see ... Harry Potter posters everywhere, I'll be fine."[101] In March 2011, after 18 months at the university, Watson announced that she was deferring her course for "a semester or two",[105] to give her more time to participate in the advertising buildup for the release of the second Deathly Hallows film, and other projects.[106] It was later announced that she would leave Brown altogether, transfering to another, then-unnamed, American university.[107]

As of July 2007, Watson's work in the Harry Potter series had earned her more than £10 million, and she acknowledged she would never have to work for money again.[4] In March 2009, she was ranked 6th on the Forbes list of "Most Valuable Young Stars",[108] and in February 2010, she was named as Hollywood's highest paid female star, having earned an estimated £19 million in 2009.[109] However, she has declined to leave school to become a full-time actress, saying "People can't understand why I don't want to ... but school life keeps me in touch with my friends. It keeps me in touch with reality."[13] She has been positive about working as a child actress, saying her parents and colleagues helped make her experience a positive one.[33][90][110] Watson enjoys a close friendship with her fellow Harry Potter stars Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint, describing them as a "unique support system" for the stresses of film work, and saying that, after working with them for the ten years of the film series, "they really are like my siblings".[14]

Watson lists her interests as dancing, singing, field hockey,[12][111] tennis, art,[72] and she supports the Wild Trout Trust.[112][113][114] She describes herself as "a bit of a feminist",[13][90] and admires fellow actors Johnny Depp and Julia Roberts.[115]

FilmographyYear Title Role Notes

2001 Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Hermione Granger Released as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in the US and India

2002 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Hermione Granger

2004 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Hermione Granger

2005 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Hermione Granger

2007 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Hermione Granger

2007 Ballet Shoes Pauline Fossil Television film shown on BBC One

2008 Tale of Despereaux, TheThe Tale of Despereaux Princess Pea Voice part

2009 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Hermione Granger

2010 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Hermione Granger

2011 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Hermione Granger

2011 My Week with Marilyn Lucy In production

AwardsYear Organisation Award Film Result

2002 Young Artist Awards Best Performance in a Feature Film – Leading Young Actress Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Won[19]

2002 Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films Saturn Award Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Nominated[116]

2002 Empire Empire Award Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Nominated[117]

2002 American Moviegoer Awards Outstanding Supporting Actress Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Nominated[118]

2003 Otto Awards Best Female Film Star (Silver) Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Won[22]

2004 Otto Awards Best Female Film Star (Silver) Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Won[25]

2004 Total Film Child Performance of the Year Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Won[27]

2004 Broadcast Film Critics Association Best Young Actress Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Nominated[119]

2005 Otto Awards Best Female Film Star (Gold) Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Won[26]

2005 Broadcast Film Critics Association Best Young Actress Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Nominated[31]

2006 Otto Awards Best Female Film Star (Bronze) Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Won[30]

2006 MTV Movie Awards Best On-Screen Team Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Nominated[32]

2007 ITV National Film Awards Best Female Performance Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Won[37]

2007 UK Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards Best Movie Actress Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Won[120]

2008 UK Sony Ericsson Empire Awards Best Actress Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Nominated[121]

2008 Constellation Award Best Female Performance Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Won[122]

2008 Otto Awards Best Female Film Star (Gold) Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Won[123]

2008 SyFy Genre Awards Best Actress Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Won[124]

2008 Glamour Awards Best UK TV Actress Ballet Shoes Nominated[125]

2009 Scream Awards Best Fantasy Actress Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Nominated[126]

2010 National Movie Awards Performance of the Year Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Nominated[127]

2010 MTV Movie Awards Best Female Performance Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Nominated[128]

2010 Teen Choice Awards Actress Fantasy Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Nominated[129]

2011 People's Choice Awards Favorite Movie Star Under 25 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Nominated[130]

2011 Kids' Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Nominated[131]

2011 National Movie Awards Performance of the Year Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Nominated[132]

References1.^ a b "Emma Watson". The Late Show with David Letterman. CBS. 8 July 2009. No. 3145.

2.^ Kehr, Dave. "Emma Watson". The New York Times. http://movies.nytimes.com/person/300014/Emma-Watson. Retrieved 12 January 2008.

3.^ Warner Bros. (23 March 2007). "Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint and Emma Watson to Reprise Roles in the Final Two Installments of Warner Bros. Pictures' Harry Potter Film Franchise". Press release. http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/March2007/23/c6173.html. Retrieved 23 March 2007.

4.^ a b Stenzhorn, Stefan (27 July 2007). "Potter star Watson "rich enough to retire"". RTÉ.ie Entertainment. http://www.emmaempire.net/archives/news.en.4339.html. Retrieved 27 July 2007.

5.^ a b "The Tale of Despereaux". Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=taleofdespereaux.htm. Retrieved 16 April 2010.

6.^ Gould, Lara (5 August 2007). "Hermione Set for BBC Role". The Sunday Mirror. http://www.mirror.co.uk/sunday-mirror/2007/08/05/hermione-all-set-for-bbc-role-98487-19572308/. Retrieved 6 August 2007.

7.^ a b c d e "Life & Emma". Official website. http://www.emmawatson.com/en/Emma/About/. Retrieved 16 April 2010.

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9.^ Barlow, Helen. "A life after Harry Potter". The Sydney Morning Herald. http://www.smh.com.au/news/film/a-life-after-harry-potter/2007/07/01/1183228944244.html. Retrieved 16 March 2006.

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132.^ http://www.nationalmovieawards.com/home

External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Emma Watson

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Name Watson, Emma

Alternative names Watson, Emma Charlotte Duerre

Short description British actress

Date of birth 15 April 1990

Place of birth Paris, France

Date of death

Place of death

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emma_Watson"

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About Daniel Radcliffe

Posted by The Ricky Bear Company, Inc. on May 5, 2011 at 8:01 PM Comments comments (0)

Daniel RadcliffeFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Daniel Radcliffe

Radcliffe in November 2010

Born Daniel Jacob Radcliffe[1][2]

23 July 1989 (1989-07-23) (age 21)

Hammersmith, London,

United Kingdom

Occupation Actor

Years active 1999 – present

Daniel Jacob Radcliffe (born 23 July 1989)[3] is an English actor who rose to prominence playing the titular character in the Harry Potter film series adapted from the book series of the same name. Radcliffe was cast as Harry at the age of eleven.[4] From 2001 to 2010, he starred in seven Harry Potter films alongside Rupert Grint and Emma Watson; he will return for the final installment: the second part of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2011). Radcliffe's work on the Harry Potter series has earned him several awards and more than £60 million.

In 2007, Radcliffe was involved in three non-Harry Potter productions: the television adaptation of the play My Boy Jack, the film adaptation of the novel December Boys and the theater production Equus, for which he earned a Drama Desk Award nomination. Since then he has appeared in the theater production How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (2011), and has filmed the film adaptation of the novel The Woman in Black (2012).

Radcliffe has also contributed to many charities, including Demelza House Children's Hospice and The Trevor Project; he won the Trevor Project's "Hero Award" in 2011. Radcliffe also suffers from a mild form of the neurological disorder dyspraxia.

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Career

2.1 Stage career

3 Personal life

4 Stage and screen credits

4.1 Films

4.2 Television

4.3 Stage

5 Awards

5.1 Nominations

5.2 Wins

6 See also

7 References

8 Further reading

9 External links

 

Early lifeRadcliffe was born in Queen Charlotte's Hospital, Hammersmith, West London, England,[3] the only child of Alan George Radcliffe, a literary agent, and Marcia Jeannine Gresham (née Marcia Gresham Jacobson), a casting agent who was involved in several films for the BBC, including The Inspector Lynley Mysteries and, most recently, Walk Away And I Stumble.[5][6] Radcliffe's mother is Jewish and a native of Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex (her family's surname was anglicised from "Gershon");[6][7][8] his father, originally from Northern Ireland, is Protestant.[9][10]

Radcliffe first expressed a desire to act at the age of five.[11] In December 1999, aged ten, he realised his ambition and made his acting debut in the BBC's televised two-part adaptation of the Charles Dickens novel David Copperfield, portraying the title character as a young boy.[12]

Radcliffe was educated at two independent schools for boys: Sussex House School, a day school in Cadogan Square in Chelsea in London.[13] He achieved A grades in the three AS-levels he sat in 2006, but then decided to take a break from education, and did not go to college or university.[14]

CareerIn 1999, Radcliffe played the role of the young David Copperfield in the television adaptation of the Dickens novel.

In 2000, he was asked to audition for the role of Harry Potter for the film adaptation of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by producer David Heyman while in attendance at a London production of Stones in His Pockets.[15][16] In August of that year, after several auditions, he was selected to play the role in the big-budget adaptation of the award-winning book series by J.K. Rowling. Rowling herself also approved of this selection: "Having seen Dan Radcliffe's screen test I don't think Chris Columbus could have found a better Harry".[17] Radcliffe made his film debut in 2001 with a supporting role alongside Pierce Brosnan in The Tailor of Panama, and the first Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone was released later that year.

 

Radcliffe in July 2009Radcliffe starred in the seven subsequent Harry Potter film adaptations: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002), Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004), Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005), Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007), Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2009), and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, where the film was split into two parts.[18] Radcliffe has said he was "very happy" with the decision to split the last film into two parts as he believes there is "nothing in the book that doesn't relate to the main story or drive it forward" and so "there’s not much you could cut without really taking away from the book."[18]

At the age of 16, Radcliffe became the youngest non-royal ever to have an individual portrait in Britain's National Portrait Gallery. On 13 April 2006, his portrait, drawn by Stuart Pearson Wright, was unveiled as part of a new exhibition opening at London's Royal National Theatre, then moved to the National Portrait Gallery where it resides.[19]

In 2006, Radcliffe appeared in the television series Extras as a parody of himself. In the same year he filmed the independent Australian drama December Boys. During the summer of 2007, he filmed the ITV drama My Boy Jack, based upon the true story of Rudyard Kipling's son's death in battle during the First World War, which aired in the United Kingdom on Remembrance Day 2007 and premiered in the United States on 20 April 2008.[20] In the film, Radcliffe played Jack Kipling, a World War I-era soldier and the son of author Rudyard Kipling.[21] About the role, he stated: "For many people my age, the First World War is just a topic in a history book. But I've always been fascinated by the subject and think it's as relevant today as it ever was."[22]

On 9 July 2007, Radcliffe and fellow Harry Potter cast members Rupert Grint and Emma Watson left imprints of their hands, feet, and wands in front of Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood.[23]

In December 2007 the New York Times reported that Radcliffe had agreed to portray the deceased photojournalist Dan Eldon in an upcoming biopic entitled The Journey is the Destination.[24] Eldon's mother, Kathy, personally chose Radcliffe over other actors such as Heath Ledger, Ryan Phillippe and Joaquin Phoenix, noting Radcliffe's "puckishness, sense of humour and energy" as similar to her son's.[25] Radcliffe will also star in the 2011 adaptation of The Woman in Black, a 1983 ghost story by Susan Hill, which has previously been filmed as a made-for-television movie and was adapted for the stage.[26] Referring to the role, he was quoted as saying, "I am incredibly excited to be part of The Woman in Black. Jane Goldman's script is beautifully written – both tender and terrifying in equal measure."[27] The film will be released on 28 October 2011.

Stage careerIn 2002, Radcliffe appeared as a guest in the West End production The Play What I Wrote directed by Kenneth Branagh (who appeared with Radcliffe in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets as Professor Lockhart).[12]

On 27 February 2007 Radcliffe began the production of Peter Shaffer's play Equus as Alan Strang, a stable boy who has an obsession with horses. The role generated significant pre-opening media interest and advance sales topped £2 million, as Radcliffe appeared nude in one scene in the play.[28] Radcliffe's performance received positive reviews,[29] as critics were impressed by the nuance and depth of his against-type role.[30] Radcliffe's last performance in Equus took place on 9 June 2007. The production then transferred to Broadway in New York City opening on 25 September 2008, where Radcliffe reprised the role of Alan Strang along with Richard Griffiths, who was also in the Equus production in London and played Vernon Dursley in the Harry Potter series.[31][32] Prior to the play's opening he stated that he was nervous about repeating the role on Broadway because he considered American audiences more discerning than those in London.[33]

On 27 March 2011, Radcliffe debuted in the role of J. Pierrepont Finch in a Broadway revival of How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.[34][35]

Personal life

Radcliffe at the 2008 BAFTA AwardsRadcliffe has stated that he is an atheist,[36] and also "very proud of being Jewish."[37][38][39] He is a fan of punk rock music and admires a diverse lineup of bands, from Sex Pistols and The Libertines to Arctic Monkeys and more recently Jack Peñate and Kate Nash.[40] His favourite band is The Hold Steady.[41] In November 2007, Radcliffe published several poems under the pen name Jacob Gershon.[37][42]

He is reported to have earned £1 million for the first Potter film,[43] around £5.6 million for the fourth film, and more than £8 million for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. In 2010, Radcliffe was reported to have personal assets of £28.5 million, making him richer than Princes William and Harry.[44] Despite his wealth, Radcliffe has said he does not have expensive tastes. His main expense is buying books: "I read a lot."[45] Radcliffe appeared on the Sunday Times Rich List in 2006, which estimated his personal fortune to be GB£14 million, making him one of the richest young people in the United Kingdom.[46] By April 2009, The Daily Telegraph measured his net worth at £30m, making him the 12th richest young person in the UK. According to the publication, Radcliffe is expected to have amassed £70m by the time the series of films concludes.[47]

Radcliffe has been a supporter of various charities, including Demelza House Children's Hospice in Sittingbourne, Kent, to which he has requested fans make donations in lieu of birthday presents. In February 2005, Radcliffe put a "Hogwarts Crew" T-shirt which he autographed up for auction to help raise money for the Tsunami victims in 2005. His T-shirt was part of the Tsunami Clothes Auction that raised money for the Rebuilding Sri Lanka Organization. He wore the T-shirt during the making of the film, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. These T-shirts were only issued to members of the cast and crew. His shirt raised £520.[48]

In a 2009 issue of Attitude, Radcliffe announced his support for the Liberal Democrats.[49] Radcliffe also positions himself as a gay rights activist by speaking out against homophobia and filmed a public service announcement for The Trevor Project promoting awareness of gay teen suicide prevention.[50][51] He has also contributed financially to The Trevor Project.[52] In 2011, Radcliffe was a recipient of the Trevor Project's "Hero Award" for assisting the Project in gay teen suicide prevention.[53]

He has become a keen follower of cricket[54] and attended the first England v India test match on his 18th birthday. He queued up for the autographs of Indian batting maestro Sachin Tendulkar and English opening batsman Andrew Strauss at the end of the final day's play.[55] Regarding this, he stated:[56]

I was telling people in a recent interview that I had a dream that Andrew Strauss was chasing me with a cricket bat. It was during the West Indies series when Andrew wasn’t doing too well and an Australian who was listening in piped up and said, "I wouldn’t worry about Strauss, if he had a swing at you at the moment he’d probably miss."

Radcliffe has stated that he suffers from a mild form of the neurological disorder dyspraxia.[57]

Stage and screen creditsFilms

Radcliffe at December Boys premiere in 2007Year Title Role Notes

2001 The Tailor of Panama Mark Pendel Supporting role

2001 Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Harry Potter Released as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in the US and India

2002 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

2004 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

2005 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

2007 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

2007 December Boys Maps

2009 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Harry Potter

2010 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

2011 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 Post-production

2011 The Journey is the Destination Dan Eldon In production

2011 The Woman in Black Arthur Kipps Filming

Television1999: David Copperfield as young David Copperfield

2005: Foley and McColl: This Way Up as Traffic Warden/Himself

2006: Extras as Boy Scout/Himself

2007: My Boy Jack as Jack Kipling

2010: The Simpsons as Edmund, in Treehouse of Horror XXI

2010: QI as himself, in the episode "Christmas Special: Hocus Pocus"

Stage2002: The Play What I Wrote as Guest (Wyndham's Theatre)

2007: Equus as Alan Strang (Gielgud Theatre)

2008: Equus as Alan Strang (Broadhurst Theatre)

2011: How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (Al Hirschfeld Theatre)

AwardsNominations2011

Best Kiss (with Emma Watson); MTV Movie Awards

Best Fight (with Rupert Grint VS Helena Bonham Carter; MTV Movie Awards)

Best Male Performance (MTV Movie Awards)

2010

Best Male Performance (MTV Movie Awards)

Global Superstar (MTV Movie Awards)

Iconic Movie Actor (J-14's Teen Icon Awards)

2009

Outstanding Actor in a Play (Drama Desk Awards)

Distinguished Performance Award (Drama League Award)

2008

Best Kiss (with Katie Leung; MTV Movie Awards)

Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)

Best Actor (Empire Award)

2006

Best Young Actor (Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards)

Actor of the Year (AOL Moviefone Moviegoer Awards)

Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)

Best Hero (MTV Movie Awards)

Best On-Screen Team (with Emma Watson and Rupert Grint; MTV Movie Awards)

2005

Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)

Best Young Actor (Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards)

2003

Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)

Best Acting Ensemble (Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards)

Most Unforgettable Scene (for the scene "Harry battles the Basilisk" in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets; American Moviegoer Awards)

2001

Best Performance by a Young Actor (Saturn Awards)

Best Young Performer (Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards)

Breakthrough Male Performance (MTV Movie Awards)

Best Newcomer (Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards)

Best Debut (with Emma Watson and Rupert Grint; Sony Ericsson Empire Awards)

Outstanding Actor (American Moviegoer Awards)

Best Performance in a Feature Film: Leading Young Actor (Young Artist Awards)

Best Ensemble in a Feature Film (with Emma Watson and Rupert Grint; Young Artist Awards)

Wins2009

Favorite Leading Actor in a Broadway Play (Broadway.com Audience Award)

Favorite Breakthrough Performance (Broadway.com Audience Award)

2008

Dewynters London Newcomer of the Year (Whatsonstage.com Theatregoers’ Choice Awards, UK)

2007

Best Male Performance (National Movie Awards, UK)

2006

Best Actor (Cine Awards, Belgium)

Best Male Film Star (Gold): Otto Awards, 2006

Best Actor/Movie (SyFy Portal's SyFy Genre Awards)

2005

Best Young Actor (SyFy Portal's SyFy Genre Awards)

2004

Top 10 Child Stars (RTL Television, Germany)

Best Breakthrough Male Actor (Star Channel Star Awards, Japan)

Best Junior Achiever (for viewers' favorite under-16 guest on the show Relly Awards)

Young Talent of the Year (ITV Celebrity Awards)

Best Movie Actor (K-Zone Kids Awards, Philippines)

Best Film Star/Actor (Dutch Kids Choice Awards)

2003

Best Young Actor (SyFy Portal's SyFy Genre Awards)

Best Actor (Roadshow Cinema Grand Prix Awards, Japan)

2002

Person of the Year (Time For Kids)

Targa d'Oro ("Gold Plate", David di Donatello Awards)

Outstanding New Talent (Sir James Carreras Award for the Variety Club Showbusiness Awards)

2001

Male Youth Discovery of the Year (Hollywood Women's Press Club)

See alsoList of Harry Potter films cast members

References1.^ "Daniel Jacob Radcliffe (actor bio)". HarryPotter.Warnerbros. http://harrypotter.warnerbros.co.uk/gobletoffire/master/index.html. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

2.^ "Daniel Radcliffe, or Daniel Jacob Radcliffe (British actor)". Britannica Online Encyclopedia. http://www.britannica.com/eb/topic-1378521/Daniel-Radcliffe. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

3.^ a b "Daniel Radcliffe Biography". DanRadcliffe.com. http://www.danradcliffe.com/biography.html. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

4.^ "Young Daniel gets Potter part". BBC News (BBC). 21 August 2000. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/890287.stm. Retrieved 12 April 2011.

5.^ "Top of the form". The Jewish Chronicle: pp. 26. 20 December 1968.

6.^ a b Kasriel, Alex; Emily Rhodes (22 December 2006). "A nice Jewish wizard: Harry Potter is Jewish – and his grandmother is very proud of him". The Jewish Chronicle. pp. 2. Archived from the original on 25 January 2008. http://web.archive.org/web/20080125121324/http://www.thejc.com/home.aspx?AId=47922&ATypeId=1&search=true2&srchstr=PATRICIA+JACOBSON&srchtxt=1&srchhead=1&srchauthor=1&srchsandp=1&scsrch=0.

7.^ "Daniel Radcliffe". Inside the Actors Studio. Bravo. 1 December 2008. No. 3, season 15.

8.^ Bloom, Nate. "Young and Rich (bottom of page)". InterfaithFamily.com. http://www.interfaithfamily.com/site/apps/nl/content2.asp?c=ekLSK5MLIrG&b=297399&ct=3724107. Retrieved 24 July 2007.

9.^ Horn, Steve (13 February 2004). "On the Set of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban". RupertGrint.net/IGN Films. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070927140459/http://www.rupertgrint.net/press/Interviews/2004ign.php. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

10.^ "Daniel Radcliffe". The Today Show. 6 December 2006.

11.^ "Faces of the week: DANIEL RADCLIFFE". BBC News. 2 March 2007. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/6413257.stm. Retrieved 1 September 2007.

12.^ a b Roberts, Sheila (10 September 2007). "Daniel Radcliffe Interview, December Boys". Movies Online. http://www.moviesonline.ca/movienews_12913.html. Retrieved 10 September 2007.

13.^ "SUSSEX HOUSE SCHOOL". Isbi Schools. http://www.isbi.com/isbi-viewschool/1158-SUSSEX_HOUSE_SCHOOL.html. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

14.^ Vineyard, Jennifer (10 July 2007). "'Harry Potter' Star Daniel Radcliffe Gets Leather-y In Racy Photo Spread". MTV. http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1564452/daniel-radcliffe-gets-leathery-photo-spread.jhtml. Retrieved 1 April 2011.

15.^ McLean, Craig (15 July 2007). "Hobnobs & broomsticks". Sunday Herald. http://www.sundayherald.com/life/people/display.var.1546220.0.0.php. Retrieved 15 July 2007.

16.^ Koltnow, Barry (8 July 2007). "One Enchanted Night at Theater, Radcliffe Became Harry Potter". East Valley Tribune. Archived from the original on 11 October 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20071011092955/http://eastvalleytribune.com/story/92834?source=rss&dest=STY-92834. Retrieved 15 July 2007.

17.^ Sussman, Paul (23 August 2000). "British child actor 'a splendid Harry Potter'". CNN. http://premium.edition.cnn.com/2000/WORLD/europe/08/22/potter.casting.02/. Retrieved 20 October 2007.

18.^ a b Jones, Alan (8 July 2009). "Daniel Radcliffe Exclusive Interview, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince". Roll Credits Online. http://www.rollcreditsonline.com/component/content/article/34-highlights/467-ftharrypotterhalfbloodprincedanielradcliffe.html. Retrieved 9 July 2009.

19.^ "Daniel Radcliffe drawing acquired by National Portrait Gallery". National Portrait Gallery. 11 April 2006. http://www.npg.org.uk/live/prelharrypotter.asp. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

20.^ Armstrong, Stephen; Canning, Hugh; Dougill, David; Edwards, Mark; Hawkins, Helen; Holgate, Andrew; Kemp, Peter; Kinnes, Sally (2 September 2007). "100 best autumn arts events". The Sunday Times (London). http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/whats_on/listings/article2350320.ece. Retrieved 1 September 2007.

21.^ "Sexy Samantha will play Harry Potter's mum". Now. 5 June 2007. http://www.nowmagazine.co.uk/celeb_news/Celebrity_news_Kim_Cattrall_will_play_Daniel_Radcliffes_mum_article_122946.html. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

22.^ "Daniel Radcliffe Signs on to Made For TV Movie". IGN. 28 August 2006. http://tv.ign.com/articles/728/728703p1.html. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

23.^ "Hollywood Blvd Celebrates Potter's 'Wands Of Fame'". CBS2.com. 9 July 2007. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070927183346/http://cbs2.com/topstories/local_story_190124828.html. Retrieved 10 July 2007.

24.^ Levin, Dan (27 December 2007). "Photographs, Art and Lessons, Taken From a Life Cut Short". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/27/arts/design/27foto.html?ex=1199422800&en=522603df32e7498d&ei=5070&emc=eta1. Retrieved 30 April 2010.

25.^ Smith, David (30 December 2007). "Wizard to play the magician of Somalia". The Guardian (London). http://film.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0,,2233408,00.html. Retrieved 30 April 2010.

26.^ "Daniel Radcliffe to star in The Woman in Black". BBC News. 19 July 2010. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-10684914. Retrieved 19 July 2010.

27.^ "Daniel Radcliffe to star in The Woman in Black". BBC News. 19 July 2010. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-10684914. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

28.^ "Naked stage role for Potter star". BBC News. 28 July 2006. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/5223520.stm. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

29.^ "RADCLIFFE'S WOMEN NERVES". Contact Music. 5 June 2007. http://www.contactmusic.com/news.nsf/article/radcliffes%20women%20nerves_1033227. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

30.^ Burchell, Kenzie (28 February 2007). "Moving the Magic". MSNBC. Archived from the original on 18 March 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070318003305/http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17383712/site/newsweek/. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

31.^ Vineyard, Jennifer (4 September 2007). "Radcliffe To Bare All On Broadway As ‘Equus’ Eyes Late ‘08 Opening". MTV Movies Blog. http://moviesblog.mtv.com/2007/09/04/radcliffe-to-bare-all-on-broadway-as-equus-eyes-late-08-opening/. Retrieved 5 September 2007.

32.^ Nathan, John (9 June 2007). "London Equus – Starring Radcliffe and Griffiths – Closes 9 June". Playbill. http://www.playbill.com/news/article/108659.html. Retrieved 9 June 2007.

33.^ Nichols, Michelle (5 September 2007). "Radcliffe nervous about baring all on Broadway". Reuters. http://www.reuters.com/article/entertainmentNews/idUSN0521724920070905?src=090507_1743_ARTICLE_PROMO_also_on_reuters. Retrieved 6 September 2007.

34.^ Itzkoff, David (15 April 2010). "Daniel Radcliffe to Star in 'How to Succeed' Revival on Broadway". The New York Times. http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/15/daniel-radcliffe-to-star-in-how-to-succeed-revival-on-broadway/. Retrieved 3 October 2010.

35.^ Brook, Tom (28 March 2011). "BBC News - Daniel Radcliffe makes Broadway musical debut". BBC News. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-12879009. Retrieved 28 March 2011.

36.^ Singh, Anita (4 June 2009). "Daniel Radcliffe: a cool nerd". The Daily Telegraph (London). http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/harry-potter/5734000/Daniel-Radcliffe-a-cool-nerd.html. Retrieved 6 June 2009.

37.^ a b McLean, Craig (4 July 2009). Dan the Man. London. http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2009/jul/04/daniel-radcliffe-harry-potter-jk-rowling. Retrieved 11 July 2009.

38.^ Sessums, Kevin (26 January 2009). "Dirty Harry". The Daily Beast. http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2009-01-26/dirty-harry/full/. Retrieved 30 January 2009.

39.^ Bloom, Nate. "Young and Rich (bottom of page)". InterfaithFamily.com. http://www.interfaithfamily.com/site/apps/nl/content2.asp?c=ekLSK5MLIrG&b=297399&ct=3724107. Retrieved 24 July 2007. "Radcliffe says he is not religious at all...and while he may not be religious, it appears that he had the procedure that almost all Jewish boys have when they are eight days old."

40.^ Radcliffe, Daniel. "Daniel Radcliffe's Playlist (From iTunes)". HarryPotterTrio.com. http://www.harrypottertrio.com/music_dan.php. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

41.^ "Harry Potter reveals his favourite band". NME (UK). 20 July 2007. http://www.nme.com/news/the-hold-steady/29811. Retrieved 20 July 2007.

42.^ "Harry Potter actor Daniel Radcliffe's 'secret life as a published poet'". The Telegraph (London). 11 July 2009. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/harry-potter/5799717/Harry-Potter-actor-Daniel-Radcliffes-secret-life-as-a-published-poet.html. Retrieved 11 July 2009.

43.^ "When Danny Met Harry". The Times (UK). 3 November 2001.

44.^ "Now that's magic: Harry Potter star doubles his wealth to £28.5m in just a year". The Daily Mail (London). 16 October 2010. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1321246/Now-thats-magic-Harry-Potter-star-doubles-wealth-28-5m-just-year.html. Retrieved 13 November 2010.

45.^ Maddocks, Fiona (2 February 2007). "From Harry to hunk". London Evening Standard. http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/film/article-23384050-from-harry-to-hunk.do. Retrieved 5 October 2010.

46.^ "Daniel Radcliffe". The Times (London). 2006. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/richlist/person/0,,39471,00.html. Retrieved 5 June 2007.

47.^ Sarah Knapton (27 April 2009). "Harry Potter magic puts Daniel Radcliffe 12th on young Rich List". The Daily Telegraph. UK. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/5224902/Harry-Potter-magic-puts-Daniel-Radcliffe-12th-on-young-Rich-List.html. Retrieved 27 January 2011.

48.^ "Daniel Radcliffe Biography". Monsters and Critics. http://www.monstersandcritics.com/people/Daniel-Radcliffe/biography/. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

49.^ "Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe talks politics with gay mag Attitude and admits to backing Lib Dems". The Sun. http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/2552551/Harry-Potter-star-Daniel-Radcliffe-talks-politics-with-gay-mag-Attitude-and-admits-to-backing-Lib-Dems.html. Retrieved 28 July 2009.

50.^ Fick, David (28 February 2010). "Daniel Radcliffe Takes a Stand Against Homophobia". Musical Cyberspace. http://musicalcyberspace.wordpress.com/2010/02/28/daniel-radcliffe-takes-a-stand-against-homophobia/. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

51.^ "EQUUS Star Radcliffe Speaks Out Against Homophobia". BroadwayWorld. 27 February 2010. http://www.broadwayworld.com/article/EQUUS_Star_Radcliffe_Speaks_Out_Against_Homophobia_20100227.

52.^ "Harry Potter Wants To Put A Spell on Homophobia". Radar Online. 26 February 2010. http://www.radaronline.com/exclusives/2010/02/harry-potter-wants-put-spell-homophobia. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

53.^ "Daniel Radcliffe Wins Trevor Project's Hero Award". Broadway World. 21 March 2011. http://broadwayworld.com/article/Daniel_Radcliffe_Wins_Trevor_Projects_Hero_Award_20110321. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

54.^ Pidd, Helen (7 September 2007). "'If the script says have sex, I have sex'". The Guardian (London). http://arts.guardian.co.uk/filmandmusic/story/0,,2163370,00.html. Retrieved 7 September 2007.

55.^ "Quidditch's out, cricket is in". The Times of India. http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Delhi_Times/Quidditchs_out_cricket_is_in/articleshow/2236189.cms. Retrieved 27 July 2007.

56.^ "Tendulkar casts a spell on Radcliffe". The Hindu. http://www.hindu.com/2007/07/25/stories/2007072551451800.htm. Retrieved 25 July 2007.

57.^ Serpe, Gina (18 August 2008). "Daniel Radcliffe's Dyspraxia Diagnosis". E!Online. http://www.eonline.com/uberblog/b24227_daniel_radcliffes_dyspraxia_diagnosis.html. Retrieved 18 August 2008.

Further readingDaniel Radcliffe (2004, ISBN 1-58415-250-8)

Daniel Radcliffe: No Ordinary Wizard (2005, ISBN 1-4169-1390-4)

External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Daniel Radcliffe

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Daniel Radcliffe

Daniel Radcliffe at the Internet Movie Database

DanRadcliffe.co.uk Unofficial site; works directly with Warner Bros., Radcliffe's publicist, and Radcliffe's family

DanRadcliffe.com Unofficial site; works directly with Warner Bros., Radcliffe's publicist, and Radcliffe's family

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Name Radcliffe, Daniel Jacob

Alternative names

Short description British actor

Date of birth 23 July 1989

Place of birth London, England

Date of death

Place of death

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Radcliffe"

Categories: 1989 births | English atheists | English child actors | English film actors | English Jews | English people of Northern Ireland descent | English stage actors | English television actors | Jewish actors | Jewish atheists | Living people | Actors from London | Old Citizens (City of London School) | People from Hammersmith | LGBT rights activists from the United Kingdom

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About Cameron Diaz

Posted by The Ricky Bear Company, Inc. on May 5, 2011 at 5:16 PM Comments comments (0)

Cameron DiazFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search

Cameron Diaz

Cameron Diaz at Tribeca Film Festival 2010.

Born Cameron Michelle Diaz

August 30, 1972 (1972-08-30) (age 38)

San Diego, California, U.S.

Occupation Actress, model

Years active 1988–1993 (model)

1993–present (actress)

Cameron Michelle Diaz (born August 30, 1972) is an American actress and former model. She became famous during the 1990s with roles in the movies The Mask, My Best Friend's Wedding, and There's Something About Mary. Other notable movie credits include Charlie's Angels, and voicing the character Princess Fiona for the Shrek series. Diaz received Golden Globe award nominations for her performances in the movies There's Something About Mary, Being John Malkovich, Vanilla Sky, and Gangs of New York.

Contents [hide]

1 Early life

2 Career

2.1 Modeling

2.2 Acting

3 Personal life

3.1 Relationships

4 Filmography and awards

4.1 Films

4.2 Television

5 References

6 External links

 

[edit] Early lifeDiaz was born in San Diego, California, the younger daughter of Emilio Diaz (1949–2008), who worked for the California oil company UNOCAL for more than 20 years as a field gauger, and Billie (née Early), an import-export agent.[1][2] Her father was born in Los Angeles County. His family came from Spain via Cuba (her paternal grandparents settled in Tampa's Ybor City).[3] Her mother is of English, German, Native American and Dutch descent.[4][5][6][7] She has two older siblings: Chimene and Michael.[citation needed] She attended Long Beach Polytechnic High School, where she was in the theater program for one year.[citation needed]

[edit] Career[edit] ModelingAt age 16, she began her career as a fashion model. Diaz contracted with modeling agency Elite Model Management. For the next few years she worked around the world for contracts with major companies. She modeled for designers such as Calvin Klein and Levi's. When she was seventeen years old she was featured on the front cover of the July 1990 issue of the magazine Seventeen.[8]

[edit] Acting

Diaz at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival with Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio for the movie Gangs of New York.

Tom Cruise and Diaz at the MTV Movie Awards, June 6, 2010At age 21, Diaz auditioned for the movie The Mask, even though she had no previous acting experience,[9] based on the recommendation of an agent for Elite who met the film's producers while they were searching for the female main actress. After obtaining the main female role, she immediately started acting lessons. The Mask became one of the top ten highest grossing films of 1994,[10] and earned Diaz nominations for several awards.[11]

During the next three years, she had roles in low-budget independent films, such as The Last Supper (1995), Feeling Minnesota (1996), She's the One (1996), Keys to Tulsa (1996), and A Life Less Ordinary (1997), preferring to feel her way effectively into the business. She was scheduled to feature in the film Mortal Kombat, but had to resign after breaking her hand while training for the role.[12]

She returned to mainstream films with the major movie successes My Best Friend's Wedding (1997) and There's Something About Mary (1998), for which she was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for the category of Best Actress — Musical or Comedy. She received critical acclaim for her performance in Being John Malkovich (1999), which earned her Best Supporting Actress nominations at the Golden Globe Award, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards, and the Screen Actors Guild Awards (SAG Awards). During 1990–2000, Diaz featured in many movies, such as Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her, Very Bad Things, Any Given Sunday, and the successful adaptation of Charlie's Angels. During 2001, she won nominations for Best Supporting Actress for the Golden Globe Awards, the SAG Awards, the Critics' Choice Awards, and the American Film Institute Awards for Vanilla Sky, and also voiced Princess Fiona in the movie Shrek, for which she earned $10 million.

During 2003, Diaz received another Golden Globe nomination for Martin Scorsese's epic Gangs of New York, and became the third actress (after Wedding costar Julia Roberts) to earn $20 million for a role, receiving the sum for Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle. Her next movies were In Her Shoes (2005), and The Holiday (2006). She was preparing to work again with The Mask co-star Jim Carrey for the film Fun with Dick and Jane, but resigned to feature in In Her Shoes. Diaz reportedly earned $50 million during the period of a year ending June 2008, for her roles in What Happens in Vegas opposite Ashton Kutcher, and the Shrek sequels.[13][14][15] In 2009, she starred in My Sister's Keeper and The Box.

During 2010, Forbes Magazine ranked Cameron Diaz as the richest Hispanic female celebrity, ranking number 60 among the wealthiest 100.[16][17] Also that year, Diaz was cast as the female lead in a live action/animation hybrid film version of The Smurfs, and as well as voicing Princess Fiona for the movie Shrek Forever After, also reunited with her Vanilla Sky co-star Tom Cruise in the action/comedy Knight and Day, and on the 14 January, she played "Lenore Case", the journalist in the remake of the 1940's film, "The Green Hornet"

[edit] Personal life

Diaz during June 2007Diaz received "substantial" defamation damages from suing American Media Incorporated, after The National Enquirer had claimed she was cheating on then-paramour Timberlake.[18]

During 1992, Diaz featured in a soft-core sadomasochism video entitled "She's No Angel" filmed by photographer John Rutter. During 2003, she won an injunction against Rutter preventing him from distributing the video or accompanying photographs, but during 2004, the video was distributed online by a Russian internet website.[19][20]

When Diaz was asked if she can speak Spanish she said:

“ I go, 'God, you know, it all sounds so familiar. I know what you're saying, I really do. I just cannot respond to you back in Spanish. I can barely speak English properly.' I didn't grow up in a Cuban community. I grew up in Southern California on the beach, basically. And I'm third generation. I'm of Cuban descent.[21] ”

She endorsed Al Gore publicly during 2000. Diaz wore a t-shirt that read "I won't vote for a son of a Bush!" while making publicity visits for Charlie's Angels.[22]

Diaz has also been involved with the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), the first and largest nonprofit organization for veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and has spoken as an advocate for military families.[citation needed]

Although she was quoted by a 1997 Time magazine article as saying she was germophobic,[23] Diaz specifically denied this on the June 26, 2009, edition of Real Time with Bill Maher, saying that a small comment she made 12 years earlier regarding public bathroom doorknobs was distorted out of proportion.[24]

On April 15, 2008, her father, Emilio Diaz, died of pneumonia, aged 58.[25]

[edit] RelationshipsDuring 1995, she began a relationship with actor Matt Dillon, with whom she co-starred in There's Something About Mary; the relationship ended during 1998.[26] She then had a relationship with singer/actor Jared Leto from 1999 to 2003. Diaz dated singer Justin Timberlake from 2003 to 2006.[26] During October 2004, Diaz and Timberlake were in an altercation with a tabloid photographer outside a hotel. When the photographer and another man tried to photograph them, the couple snatched the camera. Pictures of the incident appeared in Us Weekly. Representatives for the pair claimed that they were acting a scene on a set.[27] As of July 2010, Diaz has been in a romantic relationship with New York Yankees baseball star Alex Rodriguez.[28]

[edit] Filmography and awardsDuring 1996, Diaz received an award at the ShoWest Convention for "Female Star of Tomorrow." During 2006, she won a People's Choice Award for "Favorite Leading Lady." On June 22, 2009, she was commemorated by a star-figure on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

[edit] FilmsYear Title Role Notes

1992 She's No Angel: Cameron Diaz Naked girl

1994 The Mask Tina Carlyle Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance

Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Most Desirable Female

Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best Dance Sequence

1995 The Last Supper Jude

1996 She's the One Heather

Feeling Minnesota Freddie Clayton

Head Above Water Nathalie

Keys to Tulsa Trudy

1997 My Best Friend's Wedding Kimberly Wallace ALMA Award for Outstanding Actress in a Feature Film in a Crossover Role

Blockbuster Award for Favorite Supporting Actress – Comedy

Nominated — Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

A Life Less Ordinary Celine Naville Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best Dance Sequence

1998 Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas Blonde TV Reporter

There's Something About Mary Mary Jensen ALMA Award for Outstanding Actress in a Feature Film in a Crossover Role

American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Blockbuster Award for Favorite Actress – Comedy

New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress

Teen Choice Award for Most Disgusting Scene

MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance

Kids' Choice Awards for Favorite Actress

MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss

MTV Movie Award for Best Comedic Performance

MTV Movie Award for Best On-Screen Duo

People's Choice Awards for Best Actress

Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Film Actress

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

Very Bad Things Laura Garrety

1999 Man Woman Film Random Celebrity cameo

Being John Malkovich Lotte Schwartz Nominated — American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Nominated — Chlotrudis Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Nominated — Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Nominated — Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role

Nominated — Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Film Actress

Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her Carol Faber

The Invisible Circus Faith

Any Given Sunday Christina Pagniacci ALMA Award for Outstanding Actress in a Feature Film

Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actress - Drama

Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Film Choice Hissy Fit

2000 Charlie's Angels Natalie Cook MTV Movie Award for Best Dance Sequence

MTV Movie Award for Best On-Scream Team

Nominated — Blockbuster Award for Favorite Action Team

Nominated — Kids' Choice Awards for Favorite Actress In A Film

Nominated — Saturn Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical

Nominated — Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Film Actress

Nominated — MTV Movie Awards for Best Line (For "I signed the release, so you can stick anything you want in my slot!".)

2001 Shrek Princess Fiona Voice

Nominated — Kids' Choice Award for Favorite Voice from an Animated Movie

Vanilla Sky Julie Gianni Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress

Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — AFI Award for Best Actress

Nominated — ALMA Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Nominated — Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Nominated — Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nominated — Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role

2002 The Sweetest Thing Christina Walters Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Favorite Comedy Actress

Gangs of New York Jenny Everdeane Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss

Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Favorite Film Actress

Nominated — Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast

2003 Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle Natalie Cook Imagen Foundation Award for Best Actress

Kids' Choice Awards for Favorite Actress

Nominated — MTV Movie Awards for Best Dance Sequence

2004 Shrek 2 Princess Fiona Voice

2005 In Her Shoes Maggie Feller Nominated — Imagen Foundation Award for Best Actress

2006 The Holiday Amanda Woods Nominated — ALMA Award for Outstanding Actress – Motion Picture

MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss

Teen Choice Awards for Hissy Fit

2007 Shrek the Third Princess Fiona Voice

2008 What Happens in Vegas Joy McNally Nominated — Teen Choice Award for Comedy Actress

2009 My Sister's Keeper Sara Fitzgerald Nominated — ALMA Award for Outstanding Actress – Motion Picture

Nominated — Teen Choice Awards for Film Actress

The Box Norma Lewis

2010 Shrek Forever After Princess Fiona Voice

Nominated — Annie Award for Voice Acting in a Feature Production

Nominated — Kids' Choice Award for Favorite Voice from an Animated Movie

Knight and Day June Havens Nominated — Teen Choice Awards for Film Actress

2011 The Green Hornet Lenore Case

Bad Teacher Elizabeth Halsey

2012 Gambit PJ Puznowski Pre-Production [29]

[edit] TelevisionYear Title Role Notes

2005 Trippin' [30] Herself MTV - Travel Documentary

2007 Shrek the Halls Princess Fiona Voice

Made for television

2008–2009 Saturday Night Live Kiki Deamore 3 episodes

2009 Sesame Street

2010 Top Gear Star in a Reasonably-Priced Car Series 15, Episode 5 - appeared alongside Tom Cruise

2010 Scared Shrekless Princess Fiona Voice

Made for television

2011 The Adventure of Jenny XJ9 Nora Wakeman Voice

Made for television

[edit] References1.^ Post to: (2004-05-20). "Family ties, Father & mother". People.com. http://www.people.com/people/gallery/0,,639320_3,00.html. Retrieved 2010-03-05.

2.^ FilmReference.com: Cameron Diaz Biography (1972–;)

3.^ "CAMERON DIAZ: A Life Less Ordinary: Interview". Urbancinefile.com.au. http://www.urbancinefile.com.au/home/view.asp?a=594&s=interviews. Retrieved 2010-03-05.

4.^ Inside the Actors Studio - Cameron Diaz (1/3)

5.^ Jenkins, David (2003-01-09). "Girl, interrupted". London: Telegraph.co.uk. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/4729585/Girl-interrupted.html. Retrieved 2008-03-06.

6.^ "Cameron Diaz: Hollywood crowd-pleaser". BBC News. 2005-07-29. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/film/4717013.stm. Retrieved 2008-01-12.

7.^ Hawk, Mason (1998). "A Cheap Date With Cameron Diaz". NYRock. http://www.nyrock.com/spc/1998/diaz.asp. Retrieved 2008-01-12.

8.^ "Covers Throughout the Years - Historic Seventeen Magazine Covers". Seventeen. 2010-10-30. http://www.seventeen.com/fun/articles/65th-anniversary-cover-archive. Retrieved 2011-02-22.

9.^ Actress of the week – Cameron Diaz askmen.com'.' Retrieved November 20, 2006.

10.^ "1994 DOMESTIC GROSSES, #1–50", Box Office Mojo

11.^ The Task (1994) – Awards IMDb

12.^ "Cameron Diaz Was Almost In Mortal Kombat?". HEAVY. 2009-12-23. http://www.heavy.com/movies/2009/12/cameron-diaz-was-almost-in-mortal-kombat/. Retrieved 2011-02-22.

13.^ Rose, Lacy (2008-08-07). "Hollywood's Top-Earning Actresses". Forbes Magazine. http://www.forbes.com/2008/08/07/diaz-knightly-aniston-biz-media-cx_lr_0811actresses.html. Retrieved 2008-11-02.

14.^ "Top 5 list of Hollywood's highest paid actresses." Hollyscoop.com 2008]

15.^ "Only women to make it into top earners." Adelaide Now

16.^ "Richest Hispanic Celebrities According to Forbes". Celestrellas.com. 2010-07-07. http://www.celestrellas.com/2010/07/07/richest-hispanic-celebrities-list-forbes/. Retrieved 2011-02-22.

17.^ "Cameron Diaz Forbes 100 Celebrity list". Forbes.com. http://www.forbes.com/lists/2010/53/celeb-100-10_Cameron-Diaz_9D3T.html. Retrieved 2011-02-22.

18.^ "Libel damages for US actress Diaz". BBC News. 2007-02-16. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/6368533.stm. Retrieved 2007-02-16.

19.^ "Kinky Cameron Diaz video hits web". China Daily. 2004-07-09. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2004-07/09/content_347048.htm. Retrieved 2009-06-17.

20.^ "Topless Diaz hits internet". News24.com. 2004-07-09. http://www.news24.com/News24/Entertainment/Abroad/0,,2-1225-1243_1555486,00.html. Retrieved 2009-06-17.

21.^ James, Christine (1999). "Cameron Diaz: Bringing a Woman's Touch to Any Given Sunday". Reel.com. Archived from the original on 2007-12-10. http://web.archive.org/web/20071210230318/http://www.reel.com/reel.asp?node=features/interviews/diaz. Retrieved 2008-01-12.

22.^ "LiberalArtists.com". LiberalArtists.com. http://www.liberalartists.com/cgi-bin/index.cgi?action=viewnews&id=52. Retrieved 2010-03-05.

23.^ Cameron Diaz on OCD Time Magazine November 10, 1997

24.^ Real Time with Bill Maher, Episode 159 (June 26, 2009)

25.^ "Cameron Diaz's father succumbs to pneumonia". 2008-04-16. http://entertainment.oneindia.in/hollywood/top-stories/scoop/2008/cameron-diaz-father-pneumonia-dead-160408.html. Retrieved 2008-04-16.

26.^ a b "Cameron Diaz Biography". Movies.yahoo.com. http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/contributor/1800020297/bio. Retrieved 2011-02-22.

27.^ Justin, Cameron Go Camera Shy E-online Joal Ryan – November 10, 2004

28.^ Yankees' slugger Alex Rodriguez, Cameron Diaz keep romance low key at CC Sabathia's birthday bash DailyNews.com

29.^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0404978/

30.^ "MTV.com Trippin' series Info". MTV. http://www.mtv.com/shows/trippin/series.jhtml. Retrieved 2011-01-20.

[edit] External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cameron Diaz

Cameron Diaz at the Internet Movie Database

Cameron Diaz at People.com

Cameron Diaz at TV.com

Cameron Diaz at Yahoo! Movies

Photographs and literature

[hide]v · d · eMTV Movie Award for Best Performance

 

Arnold Schwarzenegger / Linda Hamilton (1992) • Denzel Washington / Sharon Stone (1993) • Tom Hanks / Janet Jackson (1994) • Brad Pitt / Sandra Bullock (1995) • Jim Carrey / Alicia Silverstone (1996) • Tom Cruise / Claire Danes (1997) • Leonardo DiCaprio / Neve Campbell (1998) • Jim Carrey / Cameron Diaz (1999) • Keanu Reeves / Sarah Michelle Gellar (2000) • Tom Cruise / Julia Roberts (2001) • Will Smith / Nicole Kidman (2002) • Eminem / Kirsten Dunst (2003) • Johnny Depp / Uma Thurman (2004) • Leonardo DiCaprio / Lindsay Lohan (2005) • Jake Gyllenhaal (2006) • Johnny Depp (2007) • Will Smith / Ellen Page (2008) • Zac Efron / Kristen Stewart (2009) • Robert Pattinson / Kristen Stewart (2010)

 

Persondata

Name Diaz, Cameron Michelle

Alternative names

Short description fashion model (1988–1993), actress (1993–present)

Date of birth 1972-8-30

Place of birth San Diego, California, U.S.

Date of death

Place of death

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameron_Diaz"

Categories: 1972 births | Actors from California | American entertainers of Cuban descent | American female models | American film actors | American people of Native American descent | American people of English descent | American people of German descent | American people of Spanish descent | American people of Dutch descent | American voice actors | Hispanic and Latino American actors | Living people | People from San Diego, California

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